Watch The Royal Ballet in Cinemas All Year Long

The Royal Ballet's Vadim Muntagirov and Marianela Nuñez in La Bayadère. Photo by Bill Cooper, Courtesy ROH.

Do you ever wish you could teleport to London and casually stroll into The Royal Opera House to see some of the world's best-loved ballets? Well, we have a solution for you: The Royal Ballet's 2018-19 cinema season.

Whether live or recorded, the seven ballet programs listed below, streaming now through next October, will deliver all of the magic that The Royal Ballet has to offer straight to your local movie theater. Can you smell the popcorn already?


"Don Quixote"

Carlos Acosta's 2013 production of Don Quixote is streaming live on February 19. This vibrant new take on an old classic stars Akane Takada as Kitri and Steven McRae as Basilio. Above, check out this behind-the-scenes video from 2013.

Click here to find a screening near you.

"Mayerling​"

Sir Kenneth MacMillan's Mayerling brings the oppressive world of the 19th century Austro-Hungarian courts to life through this dark love story between Crown Prince Rudolf and his young mistress, Mary Vetsera. Playing from November through July, Mayerling stars The Royal Ballet principals Steven McRae and Sarah Lamb.

Click here to find a screening near you.

​"La Bayadère"

Join The Royal Ballet in the Kingdom of the Shades now through next October. La Bayadère, choreographed by Natalia Makarova after Marius Petipa, tells the story of deceit and heartbreak in an ancient Indian kingdom. The ballet's central love triangle features Vadim Muntagirov as Solor, Natalia Osipova as Gamzatti and Marianela Nuñez as Nikiya.

Click here to find a screening near you.

"The Nutcracker"

What's December without The Nutcracker? The Royal Ballet's version, featuring Marianela Nuñez as the Sugar Plum Fairy, Vadim Muntagirov as The Prince, Anna Rose O'Sullivan as Clara and Marcelino Sambé as The Nutcracker streams live December 3, followed by showings throughout the month.

Click here to find a screening near you.

"Swan Lake"

Throughout December audiences can see The Royal Ballet's brand new production of Swan Lake by artist in residence Liam Scarlett. Based on Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov's original choreography, Scarlett's version features designs by long-time collaborator John Macfarlane. Marianela Nuñez and Vadim Muntagirov will dance the leading roles of Odette/Odille and Siegfried, and Bennet Gartside will play Von Rothbart.

Click here to find a screening near you.

"Within the Golden Hour"/New Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui/"Flight Pattern"

Starting with a live stream on May 16, audiences can take a break from story ballets to catch a glimpse of The Royal Ballet's contemporary side. This mixed repertoire program includes Christopher Wheeldon's Within the Golden Hour, Crystal Pite's Flight Pattern and a world premiere by Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui. Above, Pite discusses Flight Pattern, an exploration of the refugee crisis.

Click here to find a screening near you.

"Romeo and Juliet"

Last but by no means least is Sir Kenneth MacMillan's Romeo and Juliet, streaming live on June 11. The ballet's 1965 premiere at Covent Garden was met with 40 minutes of applause and 43 curtain calls; it's been a celebrated part of the company's repertoire ever since. Principals Yasmine Naghdi and Matthew Ball star in the title roles.

Click here to find a screening near you.

The Conversation
Ballet Stars
Gabriel Figueredo dancing Chroma by Wayne McGregor at YAGP's 2019 Gala. VAM Productions, Courtesy YAGP.

If you don't recognize Gabriel Figueredo's name yet, it's only a matter of time. Not only did the 18-year-old win the Grand Prix Award at the 2019 Youth America Grand Prix New York Finals, but he took second place at the 2019 Prix de Lausanne. For Figueredo, returning to YAGP this year was like a comeback tour; He won the Youth Grand Prix Award in 2013. The Brazilian-born dancer is long and lithe, but exhibits careful control while onstage. His extreme flexibility and extension are matched by a penchant for turning; his Instagram account is filled with videos from the studio.

Keep reading... Show less
News
Alexei Ratmansky in rehearsal for Harlequinade with ABT's Blaine Hoven and Christine Shevchenko. Rosalie O'Connor, Courtesy ABT.

This year marks Alexei Ratmansky's 10th anniversary as artist in residence of American Ballet Theatre.

Keep reading... Show less
Still of Fonteyn from the 1972 film I Am a Dancer. Photo courtesy DM Archives

On May 18, 1919, Margot "Peggy" Hookham was born. She would grow up to become Dame Margot Fonteyn, England's homegrown prima ballerina. She joined the Sadler's Wells School in 1934 and was performing principal roles with the precursor to The Royal Ballet the next year. Fonteyn was a company-defining figure, dancing Aurora for the re-opening of the Royal Opera House after World War II, creating numerous roles with Sir Frederick Ashton and forging a legendary partnership with Rudolf Nureyev.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Yos Clark, of Africa's Ivory Coast. Courtesy Ballet Rising.

From his home in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, an eight-year-old boy named Yos Clark discovered ballet from the film Un, Dos, Tres, and began teaching himself to dance through videos. A teacher in France saw photos of Yos dancing online, and taught him over Skype because the studio in Abidjan was too long of a commute for him to train there on a regular basis. Apparently, the lessons paid off; last year, Yos received a scholarship to continue his training in Warrington, England.

Dancers like Clark are what propel former Dutch National Ballet principal Casey Herd recently; since leaving the company three years ago, Herd has become determined to shed light on the lesser-known stories of dancers making it around the world. Now, he and his friend and colleague Chris Weisler are creating a documentary project called Ballet Rising. Together they have been transversing the globe, searching for people embracing ballet. (Since the series is still in development, a premiere date is TBA.) Between stops, Pointe touched base with Herd over the phone to learn about the project, where his travels have taken him so far, and what his hopes are for the future of global ballet.

Keep reading... Show less