The Royal Ballet's Vadim Muntagirov and Marianela Nuñez in La Bayadère. Photo by Bill Cooper, Courtesy ROH.

Watch The Royal Ballet in Cinemas All Year Long

Do you ever wish you could teleport to London and casually stroll into The Royal Opera House to see some of the world's best-loved ballets? Well, we have a solution for you: The Royal Ballet's 2018-19 cinema season.

Whether live or recorded, the seven ballet programs listed below, streaming now through next October, will deliver all of the magic that The Royal Ballet has to offer straight to your local movie theater. Can you smell the popcorn already?


"Romeo and Juliet"

Sir Kenneth MacMillan's Romeo and Juliet will stream live on June 11. The ballet's 1965 premiere at Covent Garden was met with 40 minutes of applause and 43 curtain calls; it's been a celebrated part of the company's repertoire ever since. Principals Yasmine Naghdi and Matthew Ball star in the title roles.

Click here to find a screening near you.

"Within the Golden Hour"/New Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui/"Flight Pattern"

Starting with a live stream on May 16, audiences can take a break from story ballets to catch a glimpse of The Royal Ballet's contemporary side. This mixed repertoire program includes Christopher Wheeldon's Within the Golden Hour, Crystal Pite's Flight Pattern and a world premiere by Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui. Above, Pite discusses Flight Pattern, an exploration of the refugee crisis.

Click here to find a screening near you.

"Don Quixote"

Carlos Acosta's 2013 production of Don Quixote is streaming live on February 19. This vibrant new take on an old classic stars Akane Takada as Kitri and Steven McRae as Basilio. Above, check out this behind-the-scenes video from 2013.

Click here to find a screening near you.

"Mayerling​"

Sir Kenneth MacMillan's Mayerling brings the oppressive world of the 19th century Austro-Hungarian courts to life through this dark love story between Crown Prince Rudolf and his young mistress, Mary Vetsera. Playing from November through July, Mayerling stars The Royal Ballet principals Steven McRae and Sarah Lamb.

Click here to find a screening near you.

​"La Bayadère"

Join The Royal Ballet in the Kingdom of the Shades now through next October. La Bayadère, choreographed by Natalia Makarova after Marius Petipa, tells the story of deceit and heartbreak in an ancient Indian kingdom. The ballet's central love triangle features Vadim Muntagirov as Solor, Natalia Osipova as Gamzatti and Marianela Nuñez as Nikiya.

Click here to find a screening near you.

"The Nutcracker"

What's December without The Nutcracker? The Royal Ballet's version, featuring Marianela Nuñez as the Sugar Plum Fairy, Vadim Muntagirov as The Prince, Anna Rose O'Sullivan as Clara and Marcelino Sambé as The Nutcracker streams live December 3, followed by showings throughout the month.

Click here to find a screening near you.

"Swan Lake"

Throughout December audiences can see The Royal Ballet's brand new production of Swan Lake by artist in residence Liam Scarlett. Based on Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov's original choreography, Scarlett's version features designs by long-time collaborator John Macfarlane. Marianela Nuñez and Vadim Muntagirov will dance the leading roles of Odette/Odille and Siegfried, and Bennet Gartside will play Von Rothbart.

Click here to find a screening near you.

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