Our 8 Favorite Ballet TED Talks

Earlier this month we learned that former comp star and current UC Berkeley student Miko Fogarty will be giving a TEDx talk in March about her path from ballet to college. This news got us thinking about some of our favorite ballet TED talks from years past. Check out our top eight now!


Michaela DePrince: "From 'Devil's Child' to Star Ballerina"

You might already be familiar with Michaela DePrince's ultra-inspirational journey from an orphanage in Sierra Leone to the Dutch National Ballet, but hearing her story in her own words takes it to a whole new level.

"The Physics of the 'Hardest Move' in Ballet"

Understand the physics of fouetté turns in this short and sweet TED-Ed video. We know that the animated ballerina doesn't have perfect technique (those biscuits!), but it's a fascinating explanation of something we take for granted, and it might be able to help you get closer to the famous 32.

Claudia Schreier: "Thinking On Your Feet"

In this TEDx video, ballet choreographer Claudia Schreier pulls back the veil on her creative process, and discusses the way that choreographic principals can apply to the infinite variations of human relationships.

Juliet Doherty: "Be Great!"

Here, a 15-year-old Juliet Doherty, braces and all, shares her idea of what being great really means. Fresh off her gold medal win at 2012's Youth America Grand Prix, Doherty explains how she learned to stop judging herself and focus on dancing.

"The Origins of Ballet" 

This animated video from TED-Ed gives a super concise version of the history of ballet, from Italian Renaissance courts to today. All in four and a half minutes... Impressive, right?

Darcey Bussell: "The Evolution of Ballet"

If you're looking for a slightly more in-depth take on ballet history, this talk by former Royal Ballet principal Darcey Bussell is for you. Bussell emphasizes innovations in costuming and includes performance clips from Anna Pavlova, Galina Ulanova and Margot Fonteyn.

Misty Copeland: "The Power of Ballet"

In this 2012 video from TEDxGeorgetown, Misty Copeland talks about the history of black dancers in ballet, citing luminaries like Arthur Mitchell, Lauren Anderson and Raven Wilkinson, and stresses the importance of sharing the stories of those who came before her.

Robert Binet: "Challenging Gender Stereotypes"

In this 2015 talk from TEDxToronto, National Ballet of Canada associate choreographer Robert Binet discusses his work Orpheus Becomes Eurydice, which turned the familiar myth's gender roles on their heads. The video includes excerpts from his ballet, performed live.

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