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Los Angeles-Based Ballerinas, Listen Up! Lizzo Wants You

Lizzo and her backup dancers and singers at the 2019 Music Video Awards. Courtesy MTV.

Last summer, Lizzo put out a call on Twitter asking her fans to make a ballet to her song "Truth Hurts," and dancers everywhere responded (our favorites still might be Harper Watters and Erica Lall). But now, Lizzo has fully proven herself to be a bunhead at heart: Last night, she put out a plea on Instagram looking for ballet dancers on pointe to perform with her. "I would like ballet dancers that look like me" she said in the video selfie. "I know you all exist. We've been looking, and it's hard to find."


One of the countless ways that Lizzo has become a pop icon over the past year is by hiring plus-size dancers for her live shows. Her choreographer, Jemel McWilliams, recently told Dance Magazine that at first they had a very hard time finding experienced professional dancers who were curvier. But then, like now, Lizzo turned to her huge social media following to get the word out. While her most recent post specifies that dancers should live in Los Angeles, we imagine that might change over time. "Send a video of you doing some ballet on pointe to my choreographer," says Lizzo. "Pull up, thick girl ballerinas, let's go!"

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Are you a total bunhead who loves to write? You might be the perfect fit for Pointe. We're seeking an editorial intern who's equally passionate about ballet and journalism.

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Sponsored by Ellison Ballet
Rachel Neville, Courtesy Ellison Ballet

If you've got your heart set on dancing for, say, San Francisco Ballet, you should attend a school that specializes in Balanchine, right? Not necessarily: It's actually a misconception that you have to train in a particular style or technique in order to pursue a career in that style. Ellison Ballet in New York City—which specializes in Vaganova technique—is living proof: Graduates of Ellison's year-round program and summer intensives go on to ballet companies that perform in a wide range of styles, and use what they've learned from Vaganova to land jobs.

Here are five reasons why studying Vaganova technique can actually make you a sought-after dancer for any number of ballet companies:

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Ballet Stars
Karina González in Ben Stevenson's Coppélia. Amitava Sarkar, Courtesy Houston Ballet.

Are you more of a Giselle or a Juliet?

I've always said that my favorite role is Juliet, because of her vulnerability and maturity throughout the ballet. But now that I've performed Giselle, I find her so incredibly enjoyable, from being a village girl who falls in love for the first time to the most tender, almost weightless dancing in Act II.

Are you more at home in the studio or onstage?

I love the time in the studio. The process of starting from zero to getting better each day is so rewarding. My favorite phrase in rehearsals is "Let's do it again, so I can sleep in peace tonight." I need to feel so comfortable in the studio so that when I am onstage there are no bad surprises.

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Dancers certainly don't need anyone to tell them how physical their profession is. But now, we have the data to prove it.

Researchers at InsuranceProviders.com analyzed data from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET), a national organization developed through support from the U.S. Department of Labor/Employment and Training Administration, to determine the 20 most physically demanding jobs in the country. They analyzed the level of strength, stamina, flexibility and coordination required for a host of jobs, and each category was assigned

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