Via @lizzo on Twitter

Lizzo Challenged the Internet to Make a Ballet to "Truth Hurts," and Dancers Everywhere Are Responding

On August 20, pop goddess Lizzo tweeted, "Someone do a ballet routine to truth hurts pls," referring to the anthem that's been top on everyone's playlists this summer. Lizzo might not know it yet, but ballet dancers are not known for shying away from a challenge. In the past two days, the internet has exploded with responses, with dancers like Houston Ballet's Harper Watters and American Ballet Theatre's Erica Lall tagging the singer in submissions.

Below are a few of our favorites so far, but we're guessing that this is just the beginning. Ballet world, consider yourselves officially challenged! (Use #LizzoBalletChallenge so we know what you're up to.)


Harper Watters

Houston Ballet soloist Harper Watters incorporated a jazzy flair to his response. We know Lizzo asked for ballet, but next time we'd like to see him in heels...

Erica Lall

American Ballet Theatre's Erica Lall and James Whiteside took a break from rehearsal for this professionally filmed take. We love that Lall manages to flawlessly transition from a shoulder sit to twerking, all while lip synching.

Ballet Memphis

Ballet Memphis, we're looking at you. Will your new Lizzo ballet be ready for your 2019–20 season?

Little Swans

We're pretty sure that Lizzo asked for original choreography, but we'll let this one slide since this user synched the song to this Swan Lake excerpt so perfectly.

Who's next? Check out #LizzoBalletChallenge to find out!

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