In YAGP's "Ask the Expert" Video Series, Sascha Radetsky Offers Advice for First-Year Company Members

If your goal is to become a professional dancer, you likely have a lot of questions about what you need to do to get there. Last year, Youth America Grand Prix created a Facebook video series called "Ask the Expert," featuring conversations with dance professionals on topics ranging from nutrition to dancing in college to career building. (Good news: They are now available on YAGP's website and YouTube page).

This season, YAGP is expanding the series to include more interviews. The latest video features American Ballet Theatre Studio Company artistic director Sascha Radetsky. The topic? Navigating your first year of professional life, from a director's perspective. Radetsky answers questions about professional etiquette and protocol, navigating company hierarchy and managing conflicts, and offers his tips for a successful career and what qualities stand out to him in dancers.


And in case you missed it, be sure to check out "Fame Game: A Dancer's Guide to Publicity," with Dance Magazine editor in chief Jennifer Stahl. Stahl talks about how magazines choose the dancers they feature—and how best to approach them.

The next episode airs later this month. Check out the full 2018–19 schedule below:

Monday, October 29: "Wellness for Dancers," with Elizabeth Sullivan, success coach and wellness mentor for pre-professional dancers

Monday, November 12: "Injury Prevention and Treatment," with Dr. Phillip Bauman, orthopedic consultant for ABT and New York City Ballet

Monday, November 26: "Accepting a Scholarship: The Right Etiquette," with Cynthia Harvey, artistic director of ABT's Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School, and Peter Stark, associate artistic director of Boston Ballet II and head of Boston Ballet Men's Program.

Monday, December 10: "Bringing Other Art Forms Into Dance: Acting," with Susan Jaffe, dean of dance of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts

Coming in 2019 (dates to be announced):

"Cross-Training for Dancers," with ABT soloist and cross-training coach Roman Zhurbin (Part I) and Natalia Bashkatova, former Bolshoi Ballet and Cirque de Soleil principal (Part II)

"Recovering from Injury," with Dr. Philip Bauman

"Dancer's Advantage: Using Dance Training When Applying for College," with Jodie Gates, vice dean and director of USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance

"Movin' Out: Dance Training Far from Home," with YAGP scholarship services director Haruko Kawanishi

"Putting Your Best Foot Forward: The Art of Onstage Presentation," with ABT makeup artist Rena Most

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