Emma VanDeWater and Styles Dykes performing their contemporary pas de deux.

VAM/Siggul, Courtesy YAGP

YAGP Has Announced the Winners of the 2020 Pas De Deux Virtual Competition

Last weekend, Youth America Grand Prix took to the internet, hosting its first virtual pas de deux competition. Over the course of three days, YAGP streamed videos from its regional events' highest-ranked competitors for a panel of esteemed judges. And, drum roll please... YAGP has just announced the winners, spanning three categories: Senior Classical, Junior Classical and Contemporary.

You can watch the full virtual awards ceremony, hosted by YAGP director of external affairs Sergey Gordeev, below, or scroll down for the list of winners. And if you're missing the thrill of competition, don't fear: Gordeev announced that registration for the 2021 season will open on July 10, with both in-person and virtual options available.

Congratulations to all!


Senior Classical Pas de Deux

1st Place (tie)

Margarita Fernandes (age 14) and Antonio Casalinho (age 16)

Conservatorio Internacional de Ballet e Dança Annarella Sanchez, Portugal


Michela Caprarulo (age 15) and Riccardo Umberto Bruttomeso (age 17)

Il Balletto, Italy

2nd Place

Alexis Workowski (age 15) and Josue Gomez (age 16)

Fort Lauderdale Youth Ballet, Florida

3rd Place

Catherine Rowland (age 15) and Paul Piner (age 18)

International Ballet Academy, North Carolina

Junior Classical Pas de Deux 

1st Place

Ana Luisa Negrao (age 15) and Vitor Vaz (age 15)

ITEGO em Artes Basileu Franca, Brazil

2nd Place

Madison Brown (age 14) and Brady Farrar (age 14)

The Art of Classical Ballet, Lents Dance Company and Stars Dance Studio, Florida

3rd Place

Nina Miro Verger (age 9) and Asier Bautista (age 11)

Escola de Dansa d'Alaro and Jove Ballet de Catalunya, Spain

Contemporary Pas de Deux 

1st Place

Emma VanDeWater (age 17) and Styles Dykes (age 19)

Odasz Dance Theatre, New York

2nd Place

Livia Childers (age 14) and Reed Henry (age 15)

Ballet CNJ, New Jersey

3rd Place (tie)

Farrah Hirsch (age 14) and Chase Vining (age 18)

Master Ballet Academy, Arizona


Natalie May Dixon (age 17) and Tyler Schellenberg (age 18)

Edge School, Canada

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