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Congratulations to the 2019 Youth America Grand Prix Winners

Gabriel Figueredo in a variation from Raymonda. VAM Productions, Courtesy YAGP.

This week, over 1,000 young hopefuls gathered in New York City for the Youth America Grand Prix finals, giving them the chance to compete for scholarships and contracts to some of the world's top ballet schools and companies. Roughly 85 dancers made it to the final round at Lincoln Center's David H. Koch Theater on Wednesday. Today, the 20th anniversary of YAGP came to a close at the competition's awards ceremony. Read on to find out who won!


Grand Prix Award Winner

Gabriel Figueredo in a variation from Raymonda

VAM Productions, Courtesy YAGP

Gabriel Figueredo (18), John Cranko School, Germany

Senior Women

Grace Carroll in a variation from Paquita

VAM Productions, Courtesy YAGP

1st Place: Grace Carroll (15), Tanya Pearson Academy, Australia

2nd Place: Yazmin Verhage (16), Ballettschule Theater Basel, Switzerland

3rd Place: Arianna Crosato Neumann (16), Danzaira Escuela Profesional de Ballet, Peru

Senior Men

Junsu Lee in a variation from Grand Pas Classique

VAM Productions, Courtesy YAGP

1st Place: Junsu Lee (16), Korea National University of Art, South Korea

2nd Place: Francisco Gomes (15), Academia Annarella, Portugal

3rd Place: Joaquin Gaubeca (16), Cary Ballet Conservatory, Argentina

3rd Place: Harold Mendez (17), The Sarasota Cuban Ballet School, Cuba

Youth Grand Prix Winner

Darrion Sellman in a variation from Swan Lake

VAM Productions, Courtesy YAGP

Darrion Sellman (14), Los Angeles Ballet Academy, CA, USA

Junior Women

Rebecca Alexandria Hadibroto in a variation from Harlequinade

VAM Productions, Courtesy YAGP

1st Place: Rebecca Alexandria Hadibroto (12), Malrupi Dance Academy, Indonesia

2nd Place: Ava Arbuckle (14), Elite Classical Coaching, TX, USA

3rd Place: Madison Brown (13), Lents Dance Company, FL, USA

Junior Men

Misha Broderick in a variation from Diana and Acteon

VAM Productions, Courtesy YAGP

1st Place: Misha Broderick (13), Master Ballet Academy, AZ, USA

2nd Place: Andrey Jesus (13), Bale Jovem de Sao Vicente, Brazil

3rd Place: Seungmin Lee (14), Sunhwa Arts Middle School, South Korea

Pre-Competitive Age Division Grand Prix

Corbin Halloway

VAM Productions, Courtesy YAGP

Corbin Halloway (11), CityDance School and Conservatory, MD, USA

Pre-Competitive Age Division Women

Martha Savin

VAM Productions, Courtesy YAGP

1st Place: Martha Savin (11), Dance Planet, Romania

2nd Place: Kseniya Koasva (11), Ballet School of Vezhnovets, Belarus

3rd Place: Natasha Furman (10), Not Your Ordinary Dancers, NJ, USA

Pre-Competitive Age Division Men

Matthis Laevens

VAM Productions, Courtesy YAGP

1st Place: Matthis Laevens (10), Balletschool Raymonda, Belgium

2nd Place: Kai Sato (11), Y Ballet Academy, Japan

3rd Place: Aiden Johns (11), Indiana Ballet Conservatory, IN, USA

Special Awards

Joao Vitor da Silva in a variation from Coppélia

VAM Productions, Courtesy YAGP

Shelley King Award for Excellence: Summer Duvyestyn (12), Classical Coaching Australia, Australia

Grishko Model Search Award: Ava Arbuckle (14), Elite Classical Coaching, TX, USA

Natalia Makarova Award for Artistry: Anastasia Poltnikova (17), Bolshoi Ballet Academy, Russia

Dance Europe Award: Gabriel Figueredo (18), John Cranko School, Germany

Mary Day Award for Artistry: Joao Vitor da Silva (15), Ballet Vortice, Brazil

Outstanding Choreographer Award: Maiko Miyauchi and Christina Bucci, Yarita Yu Ballet Studio, Japan

Outstanding Teacher Award: Mariaelena Ruiz, Cary Ballet Conservatory, NC, USA

For the full list of winners and the schools they represented, click here. Congratulations to all!

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