Photo by Quinn Wharton

BalletNext's Violetta Komyshan on Her Style Essentials From the Studio to the Red Carpet

Though she's more at home in a leotard and tights, BalletNext's Violetta Komyshan is no stranger to red carpet glamour. Often attending award shows alongside her boyfriend, actor Ansel Elgort, Komyshan prefers to style herself. "I love dressing up," the New York City-based dancer says. "If you're going to the Oscars or a red carpet event, you need to be wearing the right thing to feel confident and secure—but I think that's true no matter where you're going."

In her day-to-day, Komyshan sticks to easy-to-wear dresses and fitted jeans from trendy brands like Revolve and Nasty Gal. But no matter what, she's never without a backpack. "My mom gave me a little black Prada backpack when I was younger, and I've been obsessed ever since," she says. "I never know if I'm going to want to take a class at Steps later or go to the gym, so backpacks let me carry everything I could need throughout the day."


In the studio, Komyshan injects a bit of her personality into her wardrobe, combining color with unique cuts (like this custom design, with a mesh neckline that creates the illusion that she's accessorized with a choker necklace). "I don't really wear warm-ups, so I'll look for leotards with cool detailing instead," she explains.

The Details—Street

Photo by Quinn Wharton

Zimmermann dress: Longer, flowy dresses like this pastel floral-print are a summer go-to for Komyshan.
7 For All Mankind jacket: "I like pairing a dress with a denim jacket like this one or a leather jacket—it's very New York to me."
Vagabond boots: "I live in boots and sneakers," Komyshan says. "I like to wear closed-toe shoes because my feet aren't very pretty. Plus, I'm on the subway and walking everywhere."
Uri Minkoff backpack: Featuring a metallic back, this is the current favorite in her ever-growing backpack collection.

The Details—Studio

Photo by Quinn Wharton at Steps on Broadway, NYC

Maldire Dancewear leotard: "I reached out to the designer after seeing someone wear one on Instagram," says Komyshan. "He does these beautiful, custom designs."
Repetto tights: "I usually wear footless, black tights over my leotard."
Gaynor Minden pointe shoes: "I just love them—they last months," Komyshan says, noting BalletNext founder Michele Wiles first told her about the shoes. "I wear elasticized ribbons with them," she adds. "They make your leg line look nice, and you don't have to worry about them falling out or fraying."

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