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There's a New Tiler Peck Documentary in the Making

Tiler Peck in "Who Cares?". Photo by Paul Kolnik, Courtesy NYCB.

New York City Ballet principal Tiler Peck and Emmy-winning actress Elisabeth Moss (of Mad Men and Handmaid's Tale fame) may seem like unlikely friends, until you dig a little deeper into their backgrounds. Both attended Westside School of Ballet in Santa Monica and spent summers at the School of American Ballet in their youths. Moss and Peck's career paths diverged when the former fell in love with acting and Peck went on to study at SAB full time, eventually becoming the star we know today. Now, the pairs' artistic pursuits are uniting in an exciting new project.

According to Deadline.com, Moss will produce a documentary featuring Peck and her work curating BalletNOW, last summer's star-studded, critically acclaimed program at Los Angeles's Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Peck was the first woman to lead BalletNOW's programming, and she brought together dancers from companies including The Royal Ballet, Miami City Ballet, American Ballet Theatre and the Paris Opéra Ballet, putting them on stage with tappers, clowns and break dancers (sometimes simultaneously).



The film will go behind the scenes, showing the days leading up to the BalletNOW performances and featuring Peck in all her dancing and directing glory. Steven Cantor, whose name you may remember from his 2016 documentary Dancer about Sergei Polunin, will direct the yet-untitled documentary. Vulcan Productions, headed by Paul G. Allen, whose arts patronage is wide and well known (the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation is a frequent funder of Pacific Northwest Ballet), acts as co-producer with Moss.

The film doesn't yet have a premier date, but we do know that it will air on Hulu. Deadline.com reports that Peck and Moss have a shared commitment to bringing ballet into the mainstream, to "break ballet out of its rarified environs and engage a new generation of dance fans via social media and even word-of-mouth campaigns at local universities."

We'll have to wait and see if the documentary will be a major step in achieving this goal. Undoubtedly, Moss's Emmy Awards, TV fans and 300k+ Instagram followers will help.

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Ballet West in rehearsal for Le Chant du Rossignol. Beau Pearson, Courtesy Ballet West.

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