Ballet Stars

These Dancers Went Eclipse Crazy

Dancers at Ballet Sun Valley marvel at the eclipse. Photo by Gemma Bond via Instagram.

Unless you've been living under a rock, chances are that you experienced the eclipse-mania that took over the country yesterday. Thousands flocked to the 70-mile-wide path of totality (the path of the moon's shadow), which stretched from Oregon to South Carolina. And dancers were no exception. Ballet stars across the country flooded Instagram with their sense of awe over this once-in-a-decade event.

Dancers at Ballet Sun Valley, the two-day festival starting today curated by Isabella Boylston, were lucky enough to be on the path of totality (in fact, Gemma Bond's new ballet for the festival was inspired by the eclipse). We love seeing dancers from different companies hanging out, and Tiler Peck posted this New York City Ballet/American Ballet Theatre crossover moment.


NYCB's Tyler Angle, also part of Ballet Sun Valley captured the critical moment on video.


Carolina Ballet interrupted rehearsal to catch a glimpse, tutu and all.


ABT's Stella Abrera and Marcelo Gomes channeled Martha Graham (though we don't remember those glasses as part of the original costumes).


Ballet's West's Allison DeBona shared the company's Balanchine spin on things, using the famous opening pose from Serenade to block their eyes.


San Francisco Ballet paused their morning class to gather at the window.


And ABT corps de ballet dancer Gabe Stone Shayer, also at Ballet Sun Valley, drew it all back to dance.

Giveaways
Modeled by Daria Ionova. Darian Volkova, Courtesy Elevé Dancewear.
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