The Best Leo for Your Body

There’s nothing better than the feeling you get when you walk into your favorite dance store. You're surrounded by shelves of pointe shoes, racks of warm ups and—my personal favorite—gorgeous leotards. But with all of those leo options, it can be a daunting task to pick out your favorites. Which will make you look your best? To help, we’ve made a list for the best leotards to flatter every body shape. When you feel comfortable in your dancewear, it can do wonders for your confidence, and in-turn, affect your performance in class, rehearsal and even auditions.

Broad Shoulders:
With wide shoulders, your goal is to draw attention inward and down. A boat neck will accentuate your collarbone while cap sleeves will help blend your shoulders with your torso. A pinched-front camisole is a good choice for when you want to go for the delicate look.
Avoid: Halter leotards, which can make the shoulders appear wider than they are.

Large Bust:
Look for leotards with a built-in shelf bra or underwire. A conservative neckline, thick straps and a high-cut leg lend more support while drawing attention away from your chest.
Avoid: A dipping neckline and thin camisole straps, which bring focus where you may not want it and pose the threat of a wardrobe malfunction.

Wider Hips:
Find a leotard that emphasizes your shoulders with an open neckline. Ornate detailing at the top such as prints, colors, patterns or gathering will take the attention upward with a fashionable addition.
Avoid: Solid colors with a plain, bare neck, which draws the eyes to your hips since there is nothing pulling the focus to the top.

Short Arms:
With the right balance of proportions, sleeveless leotards, thin straps and low necklines lengthen everything on your upper half.
Avoid: Tank leotards and three-quarter sleeves, which cut the line of the arm.

Short Legs:
You can fake a longer leg line with a high cut bottom, often called a French cut, and a plunging neck or back. These details make the entire body seem taller.
Avoid: Biketards, low-cut legs or wearing shorts over your leotard, which can cut the line at too square of an angle.

Short Torso:
You’ve likely been blessed with gorgeous long extremities, so embrace them! A classical ballet cut, camisole straps and low-cut legs are staples to look for. These all provide the illusion of an incredibly elongated torso and play up your already lengthy arms and legs.
Avoid: High leg lines, which could shrink the look of your trunk.

Stomach Insecurities:
We have all had one of those days where you just don’t love your abs. Ruching or gathering around the stomach and ribs will make your waist appear smaller and give support.
Avoid: Spandex material or milliskin without any gathering. The shiny texture brings attention where you may not want it.



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