Margot Fonteyn's name ranks among the greatest artists of the 20th century. In an era wrought with shifts in literature, philosophy and dance, she captured audiences through her dancing in seemingly tangible ways. Here, it all begins within the first few seconds of this footage of the “Rose Adagio" from 1959—we can't take our eyes off her.


Ballet dancers who have seen the “Rose Adagio" know the simplistic nature of the steps (the first few phrases consist of bourrées and port de bras). It's not until the famous promenades en attitude that the difficulty and control required for Aurora become clear (that oh-so simple spectacle makes us sweat). Nevertheless, Fonteyn treats each movement as a crucial component to Aurora's character. No step goes unattended—each is backed with passion and intent. Perhaps this is what makes her interpretation of The Sleeping Beauty the archetypal standard for ballet dancers today.

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Master pointe shoe fitter Josephine Lee of the California-based ThePointeShop chats with Ballet West soloist Chelsea Keefer to hear about how she prepares her pointe shoes. Keefer offers lots of darning tips, and shares all of the unusual ways that she uses rosin.

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At this point, you'd think we'd all be used to the level of technical absurdity Daniil Simkin achieves when he's playing around in the studio. But then he did this:

...and now we're low-key appalled in the absolute best way.

After we picked our jaws up from the floor, we were inspired to dig up clips of some of our other favorite dancers turning like it's no big deal. Here are just a few standouts.

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Natalia Makarova's version of Swan Lake, staged in the 1980s for London Festival Ballet (now the English National Ballet), incorporates a pas de quatre choreographed by Sir Fredrick Ashton into the ballet's opening act. Leanne Benjamin, then just 24 and a principal with the company, dances among the couples in this clip from a 1988 film of the ballet. The burgeoning ballerina shines in her minute-long solo, tackling intricate footwork with intelligence and spirit that foreshadow her formidable, two-decade career as a principal of The Royal Ballet.

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