Start off the season on a healthy note this fall: Have some trout, one of the healthiest fish you can include in your diet. It's filled with omega-3 fatty acids and protein, and also has low levels of contaminants like mercury. Try this recipe for Baked Trout with Shiitake Mushrooms, Tomatoes and Ginger from National Ballet of Canada principal Sonia Rodriguez.

 

Ingredients:

Nonstick cooking spray

2 whole rainbow trout (about 12 ounces each), cleaned, boned, butterflied

2 green onions, chopped

2 large fresh shiitake mushrooms, stemmed, caps thinly sliced

1/2 cup chopped seeded tomatoes

2 teaspoons minced peeled fresh ginger

2 garlic cloves, minced

4 teaspoons soy sauce (Rodriguez uses the low sodium option)

2 teaspoons Asian sesame oil

Fresh cilantro sprigs

 

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 400°F.

2. Line large-rimmed baking sheet with foil and coat with nonstick spray.

3. Sprinkle fish with salt and pepper. Open fish like a book and arrange, skin side down, on prepared baking sheet.

4. Mix onions, mushrooms, tomatoes, ginger and garlic in a bowl. Sprinkle mixture over fish. Drizzle fish with soy sauce and sesame oil, then top with cilantro sprigs. Bake uncovered until fish is opaque in center, about 20 minutes.

It's rare to find a ballet dancer without a sweet tooth—after hours of rehearsing, sometimes you just need a little sugar! Next time a craving hits, try this healthy chocolate pudding recipe from San Francisco Ballet corps member Luke Willis. He makes it with all raw and vegan ingredients, and uses avocados as a base, which means you get a nice dose of fiber, potassium, vitamin C and heart-healthy fats to go along with your dessert. Best of all? It's super simple to make after a long day in the studio.

 

Ingredients:

2-3 avocados (ripe)

1/4 cup agave, maple syrup or honey (your choice—note that honey can have a very intense flavor and is not strictly vegan)

1/3 cup (or more if needed) almond milk

2 tablespoons coconut oil

1/4 cup raw cacao powder

 

Directions:

1. Blend first four ingredients and slowly add raw cacao powder.

2. Chill for half an hour, then serve!

 

Serves 2-4.

There’s nothing better than the feeling you get when you walk into your favorite dance store. You're surrounded by shelves of pointe shoes, racks of warm ups and—my personal favorite—gorgeous leotards. But with all of those leo options, it can be a daunting task to pick out your favorites. Which will make you look your best? To help, we’ve made a list for the best leotards to flatter every body shape. When you feel comfortable in your dancewear, it can do wonders for your confidence, and in-turn, affect your performance in class, rehearsal and even auditions.

Broad Shoulders:
With wide shoulders, your goal is to draw attention inward and down. A boat neck will accentuate your collarbone while cap sleeves will help blend your shoulders with your torso. A pinched-front camisole is a good choice for when you want to go for the delicate look.
Avoid: Halter leotards, which can make the shoulders appear wider than they are.

Large Bust:
Look for leotards with a built-in shelf bra or underwire. A conservative neckline, thick straps and a high-cut leg lend more support while drawing attention away from your chest.
Avoid: A dipping neckline and thin camisole straps, which bring focus where you may not want it and pose the threat of a wardrobe malfunction.

Wider Hips:
Find a leotard that emphasizes your shoulders with an open neckline. Ornate detailing at the top such as prints, colors, patterns or gathering will take the attention upward with a fashionable addition.
Avoid: Solid colors with a plain, bare neck, which draws the eyes to your hips since there is nothing pulling the focus to the top.

Short Arms:
With the right balance of proportions, sleeveless leotards, thin straps and low necklines lengthen everything on your upper half.
Avoid: Tank leotards and three-quarter sleeves, which cut the line of the arm.

Short Legs:
You can fake a longer leg line with a high cut bottom, often called a French cut, and a plunging neck or back. These details make the entire body seem taller.
Avoid: Biketards, low-cut legs or wearing shorts over your leotard, which can cut the line at too square of an angle.

Short Torso:
You’ve likely been blessed with gorgeous long extremities, so embrace them! A classical ballet cut, camisole straps and low-cut legs are staples to look for. These all provide the illusion of an incredibly elongated torso and play up your already lengthy arms and legs.
Avoid: High leg lines, which could shrink the look of your trunk.

Stomach Insecurities:
We have all had one of those days where you just don’t love your abs. Ruching or gathering around the stomach and ribs will make your waist appear smaller and give support.
Avoid: Spandex material or milliskin without any gathering. The shiny texture brings attention where you may not want it.



According to information from the National Athletic Trainers’ Association, leaving an ankle sprain un-treated or mistreated can result in a higher risk of re-injury, chronic disability and even early arthritis.

So what should you do if you suspect you have a sprain? If you are able to put weight on the foot, the sprain can probably be treated with the time-honored RICE method: Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Prop your foot up on some cushions, wrap it with a compression bandage, and switch between icing for 10-20 minutes and removing for 10 minutes. If it's too painful to put weight on your foot, head to a doctor.

But don't pop an anti-inflammatory (such as Advil or Motrin)—at least not yet. Surprisingly, researchers have recently discovered that inflammation might actually be a necessary part of the healing process. The first pain reliever you should take is acetaminophen (like Tylenol), then after 48 hours you can switch to an anti-inflammatory.

Make sure you get a green light from your doctor or instructor before going back to the studio. Take it slow, and don’t pressure yourself to do exercises that put you in pain.

For more news on all things ballet, don’t miss a single issue.

Frozen yogurt shops have taken over the country in the last three years. Believed to be a healthier option than ice cream, fro-yo feels like a free pass to indulge in a sweet treat without the guilt. But when shops are stocked with numerous flavors and a bar of tasty toppings, the “light snack” can easily become a calorie bomb. Here’s how to navigate the fro-yo line without regretting it later.

 

Do:

  • Reverse your way down the self-serve line. Start at the topping station first and put lots of fresh fruit in your cup.
  • Ask if they have a smaller cup. Many self-serve locations have smaller containers or kids sizes that they don’t put out unless asked for.
  • Treat yourself to a spoonful of one sweet topping, such as dark chocolate shavings. It will make you feel less like you’re depriving yourself.
  • Make it a social event. We are less likely to eat as much when out with a group compared to eating alone, so grab all of your friends and head out for a treat together.

     

    Don’t:

    • Fill your cup to the top. The cups are typically large; you don’t need yours to overflow.
    • Spend more than $4.00. Aim for a serving the size of a single scoop of ice cream, or as big as a tennis ball.
    • Mix flavors. Our taste buds get overwhelmed by experiencing different flavors at once, making you want more of all of them. Stick with one flavor to feel satisfied.
    • Think sugar-free is always the better option. Sugar-free often means artificial sweeteners, which actually increase your sweet tooth. Ask for the nutrition information so you know the ingredients before filling your cup.

       

Dancers have a love-hate relationship with their pointe shoes. They give us blisters, make our feet throb and don't last very long—but if anyone tried to take them away, we'd chase them off with a stick.

So when former dancer Eliza Gaynor Minden took a closer look at traditional pointe shoe brands and noticed where improvements could be made, she jumped at the chance to develop a high-tech pointe shoe under the label Gaynor Minden.

Keep reading... Show less

What you eat when you're injured can change how quickly you get back in the studio. In The Injury Diet: Foods That Heal in Pointe's current issue, Royal Winnipeg Ballet apprentice Emily Docherty shared how her stress fractures didn't get better until she looked at her nutrition. Now she pays close attention to her daily meals. Just about every morning, she fuels up with this easy-to-make breakfast, packed with protein, vitamin C and healthy fats.

 

Emily Docherty's "Perfect Oatmeal"

Ingredients:

1/2 cup roller oats

1 banana, chopped

1 tbsp nut butter

1 1/2 tbsp ground flaxseed

Lots of cinnamon!

A dash of honey or maple syrup

1/2 cup chopped berries

 

Directions:

1. Cook rolled oats in microwave.

2. Stir in flaxseeds, nut butter, cinnamon and honey/maple syrup.

3. Mix in banana and berries.

4. Enjoy with a glass of almond milk.

In Pointe's December 2012/January 2013 issue, three dancers looked back at the summer intensive teachers who helped inspire and inform their careers. Here, Tiler Peck remembers her own seminal summer teacher, as told to writer Joseph Carman.

 

My first summer course was at SAB in 2002 when I was 12 or 13. On the first day, Suki Schorer was on me about fixing my posture, she was on me about stretching and turning out my legs, she was on me constantly for the entire class. I was getting a little teary—I thought she had it in for me. Then after class, she told me she wanted to move me up a level.

 

There’s something about Suki, her pizzazz. There is such a liveliness about her. It makes you want to work just as hard to give it back to her. She's very hands-on. She especially worked with me on my port de bras. When you’re younger, you just want it to be correct. She said to me, “Move your elbows, make it more fluid.” She said it’s like when you use a plié to get somewhere. It’s the movement before the port de bras that’s important—to connect everything, to coordinate it and make it dance.

 

We also learned Balanchine works that summer, Concerto Barocco, variations from Agon. I found my musicality at the school. Now, as I’ve grown in the company, I can finesse my musicality and play with it. With any new performance I do, Suki is always there—like my first Allegro Brillante. I love hearing corrections from her and the stories she tells us about Mr. B.

 

Sometimes it’s hard for young dancers when you first go to a summer intensive. Remember that the advice and corrections are not to beat you down. Just get as much knowledge as you can gain. Try to hear everything and take it in. Don’t get discouraged.

 

I liked ballet, but I didn’t love it until I went to SAB that summer.

 

When it comes down to it, there are two basic types of performers who make great dancers: Those who demand attention onstage, and those who inconspicuously draw it in without outwardly trying.

 

In many ways, it's much simpler to be that first type of dancer. You just have to hit it, hit it hard and give the steps everything you've got all the time. Not to say that's an easy thing to do, but audience members can't help but notice the "wow" factor of extreme technique or a fierce stage presence. This performance quality often comes in handy, winning dancers medals at competitions and helping them stand out from the crowd at cattle calls.

 

But personally, I always prefer to watch more subtle performers. I found one of them Saturday night when I saw The Washington Ballet perform a triple bill of bare-legged leotard ballets by Edwaard Liang, Karole Armitage and Nicolo Fonte. Morgann Frederick shone through the corps of each of the three pieces with an understated, but committed focus.

 

In each piece, she was never the first dancer my eye was drawn to (save for when she was showing off those runway-diva struts in Fonte's Bolero). But once I spotted her, she was captivating. Every move she made—whether it was a big developpé a la seconde or a simple turn of her head—had an intention behind it. Her eyes, her face, her very being seemed to be fully "in the present," focused on each step of the choreography. It was very internal. Yet despite eye-popping tricks or look-at-me projection, it was exhilirating. She seemed to be dancing for her, not anyone else—and throroughly enjoying it.

 

 

 

 

Heads up! Princess Grace Award applications are due April 30.



This prestigious award is given out to a handful of talented student and professional dancers each year. In addition to the actual award which covers a

year's worth of salary or tuition, winners also receive prime networking opportunities and are offered financial assistance for projects and residencies

throughout the rest of their career.



Students in pre-professional, not-for-profit dance schools or undergraduate dance departments and professionals who have been a member of their company for

less than five years are welcome to enter. Schools and companies may only nominate one dancer per year. The judging panel will choose five or six winners

in the dance performance category based on artistic development and potential for future excellence. Student winners receive one year of tuition at their

school, and professionals are given one year of salary at the dance company to which they belong. Applications can be found at www.pgfusa.com.

Ever wish there was a social network just for ballet? Check out deballet.com!

 

The newly-launched site has pages for professional dancers, choreographers, companies and schools. You can include a picture and bio, show your Twitter feed, link to your own site and Facebook and there's even a wall for other ballet lovers to leave you notes. Every dancer also has their own box of "Fans."

 

The site seems to have just started earlier this month by culling information and photos from company websites. But many dancers including two of Pointe's more web-savvy cover girls, Kathryn Morgan and Maria Kochetkova, have already started using it. Have a look around at deballet.com.

For an art form dominated by women, there sure are very few female in top positions in ballet. Actually, Richmond Ballet is hosting "The Glass Slipper Ceiling" focusing on the rarity of female artistic directors just this morning. Panelists include Ballet Memphis' Dorothy Gunther Pugh, Cincinnati Ballet's Victoria Morgan, Smuin Ballet's Celia Fushille and Richmond's own Stoner Winslett along with special guest Suzanne Farrell. Soon, it looks like we might have one more high-powered woman joining their ranks: The Royal Ballet star Tamara Rojo.

 

Earlier this week, London's The Independent published a feature by Alice Jones about Rojo. In it, Rojo says she's been working towards becoming an artistic director for some time, shadowing National Ballet of Canada's Karen Kain and earning a Master's degree in the performing arts. From what she says, Rojo seems like she would make a fantastic AD: "Ballet has to be not just good, it has to be excellent... When you have...such a big part of your budget guaranteed from the government, I think you do have more of a responsibility to be outrageous and to take risks." Rojo admits she's already eyeing a specific company to take over, but doesn't divulge which one. With a healthy mix of idealism and exacting standards, once she's ready to move on from performing, Rojo might just be the breath of fresh air the ballet world needs.

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