Health & Body
Rodrigo Bernasc via Pixabay

I'm a dancer who is currently injured and unable to walk a lot. My physical therapist and my massage therapist are giving me opposite instructions. My PT believes that I should do her exercises, even if they cause some of the "bad pain," and take three different kinds of exercise classes. My massage therapist tells me that I shouldn't do anything that causes "bad pain" and only do one exercise class per week for now. Who should I listen to? —Rachel

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Health & Body
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Freelance dancer Rebecca Greenbaum was looking forward to a fun and lucrative Nutcracker gig when she became plagued by ankle pain. An orthopedist diagnosed her with tendonitis and sent her to physical therapy. Though it was informative, her ankle troubles persisted. "I would maybe feel better for a day, but the pain would come back," she recalls, so her therapists suggested acupuncture. Greenbaum was skeptical, but she was willing to try anything. Finally, she found relief that lasted: Acupuncture combined with physical therapy got Greenbaum onstage, pain-free. Two years later, both treatments remain part of what Greenbaum calls her arsenal for maintaining wellness.

Getting injured is overwhelming for any dancer, and figuring out a recovery strategy can add to the stress. Oftentimes, it takes a team of medical professionals to help you return to the stage safely. Since knowing who to see can be confusing, we've outlined some of the most common practitioners ballet dancers might visit and why.

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