Profiles
Adiarys Almeida in Don Quixote. Courtesy Almeida.

How was training at the Cuban National Ballet School different from what you see in the U.S.?
It was free education, so it was very hard to get in, and there was a cut every year. We had academics alongside art, and we had to take a lot of different things: modern, character, ballroom, choreography composition, history of dance, music, French, makeup—everything you need for this profession.

Why did you defect?
I always wanted to have an international career. But also, I was 19, and I had a boyfriend. We were dating in Cuba when he won the lottery visa to come to the United States. When I was on tour here with the National Ballet he came to see me and I thought, I'm in love! So I stayed with him.

Has the political opening of Cuba affected you?
Before, if you defected, you had to wait five years to go back. That was pretty rough. Things have changed so much. It's about time; we're neighbors! Last year I was able to go back and perform at the Grand Theater in Havana—with my family, my teachers and my friends there.

Keep reading...
Profiles
Courtesy of Belleza Athletica

Dancer designers seem to be a dime a dozen these days. With three already in Pacific Northwest Ballet's ranks (principals Elizabeth Murphy and duo Lindsi Dec and Karel Cruz), it might seem like an over- saturated market for another dancewear brand to be able to turn heads. Enter Angeli Mamon. With her new line, Belleza Athletica (pronounced "bay-yes-ah"), the corps member is carving out a niche in studio wear with leotards and skirts that match her confident personality.

Mamon in Belleza Athletica.

Keep reading...
Profiles

Dancewear and leotards designed by ballerinas is nothing new. But Dusty Button isn't your average ballerina. The former Boston Ballet principal has made her own rules in the dance world, keeping an Instagram following of over 200,000 mesmerized with a mix of classical and contemporary clips (pirouette combos to Drake and développés to Hailee Steinfeld are just a sampling of what you'll find). But over the past few months, Button has been breaking up her usual studio clips with teasers for Bravado Dancewear line—created by Button and available now.

Keep reading...
Susan Roemer. Photo by Lois Greenfield, Courtesy Smuin Ballet.

Looking around Susan Roemer's San Francisco apartment, you'd never know she's a ballerina. There are no performance mementos on the walls, no basket of unsewn pointe shoes hinting at her role as one of Smuin Ballet's most versatile dancers. Hailed for the edgy sensibility she brings to contemporary work like Trey McIntyre's Oh, Inverted World, she's also beloved for the endearing charm she exudes in character-based pieces like Amy Seiwert's Dear Miss Cline.

What you do learn, pretty quickly, is that she's a costume designer. The hall closet is stacked floor to ceiling with storage tubs full of fabrics and patterns. Her studio consists of a clothing rack, a worktable and four sewing machines stationed a few feet from her bed. Roemer literally lives, sleeps and dreams costumes.

Keep reading...

mailbox

Get Pointe Magazine in your inbox