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Houston Ballet's Karina González and Chun Wai Chan in rehearsal for Jerome Robbins' The Cage. Lawrence Knox, Courtesy Houston Ballet.

Wonder what's going on in ballet this week? We've rounded up some highlights.

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Marcelo Gomes and Victoria Hulland in Sir Frederick Ashton's The Two Pigeons. Photo Frank Atura, Courtesy Sarasota Ballet.

Last December, in the midst of the #MeToo movement and the scandal surrounding Peter Martins, the ballet world was shocked when longtime American Ballet Theatre principal Marcelo Gomes resigned suddenly. A statement from the company revealed that ABT had learned of an allegation of sexual misconduct against Gomes related to an incident eight years prior. Gomes kept a very low profile in the aftermath before reemerging this spring. He presented a world premiere at The Washington Ballet in March and has been guesting internationally (this summer alone has him dancing in Japan, Mexico and Russia.) Now he will have a new company to call home: The Sarasota Ballet has just announced that Gomes will be joining their company as a guest artist for the 2018-2019 season.

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Marcelo Gomes and dancers of Sarasota Ballet in Ashton's "The Two Pigeons." Photo by Frank Atura, Courtesy Sarasota Ballet.

American Ballet Theatre principal Marcelo Gomes heads south this winter to create a piece on Sarasota Ballet to premiere December 1 at the Sarasota Opera House. Following the success of his 2015 ABT main-stage production AfterEffect, the burgeoning choreographer is looking forward to continuing to create outside of New York City. "We all know the big companies, but there are some really beautiful groups all throughout the U.S. that deserve just as much praise, and I'm really looking forward to spreading my work to them," he says.

Gomes comes to Sarasota Ballet from a place of familiarity. After following Gomes' career for years, director Iain Webb invited him to guest star in Sir Frederick Ashton's The Two Pigeons for a company gala last season. "He seemed to fit like a glove with us down here," says Webb about the experience. He commissioned this premiere soon after. Gomes' work will be featured on the company's Metropolitan program alongside Balanchine's Theme and Variations and Ashton's Illuminations. When asked how it feels to be grouped in with these masters, Gomes broke into laughter. "It's intimidating. It takes a lot of courage for directors to take a chance on young choreographers. But I'm humbled and honored to be next to those geniuses of ballet."


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Ballet Stars
Getty Images

Dancers are famously resourceful and particular when it comes to the products that they keep around to get them through the day. And we all know where those items live: the dance bag. While most dance bags are filled with basics like leotards, pointe shoes, Therabands and granola bars, we rounded up some of the quirkier items that dancers carry with them to provide comfort, inspiration and organization.

These snippets come from longer stories on the contents of each ballerina's dance bag—click on each dancer's name for more.


Howard with Christopher Gerty in Balanchine's "The Four Temperaments," Photo by Edwin Luk, Courtesy National Ballet of Canada

Tanya Howard

This National Ballet of Canada first soloist keeps a hand-carved wooden ballerina with her that her husband made in his high school woodworking class. After they married, Howard added her own little touch—a little rhinestone stuck onto the figurine's finger to mimic a ring. "They had to pick characters out of a book, and he chose the ballerina," she says. "It was so serendipitous! When I see this, I think about how that was years before we even met."

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Iain Webb rehearses Victoria Hulland in Sir Fredrick Ashton's The Two Pigeons. Photo Courtesy Sarasota Ballet.

Sarasota Ballet artistic director Iain Webb approached Tony Dyson—owner of Sir Frederick Ashton's Enigma Variations—about obtaining choreographic rights without knowing the historic 1968 ballet had only ever been performed by The Royal Ballet and Birmingham Royal Ballet.

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