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New York Fashion week is well and good, but the dance world awaits New York City Ballet's Fall Gala with equal anticipation. Each year, the company partners with couture designers to create elaborate, unexpected costumes for the handful of world premieres. Peter Copping, the creative director of Oscar de la Renta, has embarked on his first attempt at costume design rather than high fashion: He's redesigning the costumes for Peter Martins' Thou Swell.

Thou Swell premiered in 2003 and was last performed in 2013, and Coppings creations signify a major visual redesign for the piece. How's this green fringed dress for a contemporary tutu?

 

(Photo via Women's Wear Daily)

 

Copping is in good company—Thom Browne, Prabal Gurung, Carolina Herrera, Mary Katrantzou, Olivier Theyskens, Iris Van Herpen and Valentino have all designed for NYCB. As with all of the company's couture collaborations, I'm excited to see how the clothes work onstage. If the movement of that fringe is any indication, it should be glamorous indeed. Check out more costumes for Thou Swell here.

Oregon Ballet Theatre is back from the brink, thanks in no small part to its many friends in the ballet community. On June 12, the company—facing severe financial difficulties that left it scrambling to raise $750,000 by the end of that month—held a fundraising gala dubbed Dance United. Dancers from all over North America, including members of New York City Ballet, Boston Ballet, San Francisco Ballet, The National Ballet of Canada and The Joffrey Ballet, performed together to save OBT.

 

“Dancers have a bond that transcends time and distance, and that was really apparent to me that evening,” says OBT principal Gavin Larsen, who also performed in the gala.

 

Dance United raised $330,000 and lent the fundraising campaign much-needed momentum. The company ultimately exceeded its goal, pulling together $907,747 by the end of June. “The enthusiasm for this gala reassured me that art is not a dispensable item and that people won't let it leave their lives,” says Larsen.


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