Editors' List: The Goods
Left to right: Via Elevé Dancewear; Via LeaMarie

Planning to spend the majority of your summer sweating it out in the studio? Don't worry, you're not alone. And while you're definitely going to want to save the warmups for the winter, you can still accessorize your studio look without adding bulk, thanks to the always-in-style ballet skirt. From bright florals to washed out pastels and wild prints, we rounded up our favorite short (and a few long!) ballet skirts for summer.

AinslieWear Limoncello Wrap Skirt

via AinslieWear

f you can't spend your summer in the Mediterranean under actual lemon trees, this skirt is a solid backup. Plus, it gives us serious Beyonce "Lemonade" vibes, which will help you feel more fierce and less sweaty-mess in class (hopefully).
ainsliewear.com, $50

Ballet Stars
Paris Opéra Ballet étoile Dorothée Gilbert. Photo by Kyle Froman for Pointe.

You might be used to throwing on a leotard, tights and warm-ups each day, but now it's summer, and your schedule is different. Whether you're trying to dress to impress for a day off at your intensive or you're packing for a much-needed vacation during your company's summer break, the idea of wearing "real clothes" can leave you feeling paralyzed. Never fear! We've pulled some of our favorite dancers' street styles from past issues of Pointe to give you the summer style inspiration that you're looking for.

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Wearing footed tights over your leotard will help lengthen the look of your legs. Photo by Kyle Froman.

Do you have tips to camouflage a long torso and short legs? —Casey

As dancers, we often develop our own personal style—but it's important to think of it as flattering your proportions rather than hiding or "camouflaging" them. I have a long torso myself, and there are easy ways to highlight your line. For instance, when choosing a leotard, high necklines, like turtlenecks, will accentuate the length of your upper body. Instead, opt for open necklines and backs to visually break things up. The height of the leg opening helps, too—"ballet-cut" leotards come up higher on the hip, adding the illusion of a few more inches of leg.

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