News
Ramasar and Catazaro, via Instagram

New York City Ballet fired principal dancers Amar Ramasar and Zachary Catazaro on Saturday. Both had initially been suspended until 2019 for engaging in "inappropriate communications," while principal Chase Finlay, who was the instigator of those communications, resigned. (Although, in a statement on Saturday, NYCB made it clear they had decided to terminate Finlay prior to his resignation.)

Keep reading... Show less
News
Chase Finlay. Photo via Instagram.

Former School of American Ballet student Alexandra Waterbury, 19, is suing New York City Ballet and her ex-boyfriend, former principal dancer Chase Finlay.

Finlay resigned suddenly last week, and principals Amar Ramasar and Zachary Catazaro were put on unpaid leave for the remainder of 2018 because of "inappropriate communications" of a "personal nature."

Keep reading... Show less
Trending
Chase Finlay as Apollo. Photo by Paul Kolnik, Courtesy NYCB.

New York City Ballet will be three male principals short this season. Due to "inappropriate communications," Amar Ramasar and Zachary Catazaro have been suspended without pay until 2019, and Chase Finlay has resigned, effective immediately, according to The New York Times. (Finlay's name has already disappeared from the company roster on nycballet.com.)

A statement from the NYCB board chairman said they received a letter from someone outside of the company "alleging inappropriate communications made via personal text and email by three members of the company" that were "personal in nature." It added that the board's efforts to reach Finlay to even discuss the allegations were unsuccessful, which leads us to believe that it must have been quite a serious offense.

Keep reading... Show less
Ballet Stars
Jacques d'Amboise and Adrian Danchig-Waring in conversation at the National Dance Institute. Photo Courtesy NDI.

"Jerry, throughout his life, wanted a world where races, cultures and people came together without conflict and hate and anger, but lovingly, to make a community." These words were spoken earlier this week by Jacques d'Amboise at an event titled Upper West Side Story: A Celebration of Jerome Robbins, hosted by National Dance Institute, which d'Amboise founded in 1976 to provide free arts education to children in New York City and beyond. D'Amboise then reiterated his point by quietly singing the famous refrain from West Side Story, which Robbins choreographed and directed for both screen and stage: "There's a place for us."

Keep reading... Show less
Viral Videos
D'Amboise in the 1956 film "Carousel." Photo courtesy DM Archives.

Earlier this week, the Broadway revival of Roger and Hammerstein's Carousel, choreographed by Justin Peck and featuring New York City Ballet dancers Amar Ramasar and Brittany Pollack, was nominated for 11 Tony Awards, including Best Choreography.

Keep reading... Show less
popular

Actress Jennifer Garner just proved she might be ballet's biggest celeb fan yet with her new "Tutu Tuesday" posts on Instagram. Putting her "instastalking knowledge" to work as she calls it, Garner decided to highlight NYCB's Tiler Peck as her first "Tutu Tuesday" feature, sharing a clip of her and Amar Ramasar dancing in Justin Peck's The Times Are Racing.

You're definitely going to want to listen with the sound on for Garner's hilarious narration (and scroll over to see her amazing Photoshop skills at work in a pic of Swan Lake).

Read more at dancemagazine.com!

By now, we've come to expect the usual celebrity set like Sarah Jessica Parker and Katie Holmes at big nights in ballet like the New York City Ballet and American Ballet Theatre galas. But actress Jennifer Garner just proved she might be ballet's biggest celeb fan yet with her new "Tutu Tuesday" posts on Instagram.

Putting her "instastalking knowledge" to work as she calls it, Garner decided to highlight NYCB's Tiler Peck as her first "Tutu Tuesday" feature, sharing a clip of her and Amar Ramasar dancing in Justin Peck's The Times Are Racing.

You're definitely going to want to listen with the sound on for Garner's hilarious narration (and scroll over to see her amazing Photoshop skills at work in a pic of Swan Lake).

Read more at dancemagazine.com!

News
Sara Mearns in Walpurgisnacht Ballet. Photo by Paul Kolnik, Courtesy NYCB.

When New York City Ballet went on a three-week tour to Paris last summer, we wished we could tag along. The company presented 20 ballets at the historic Théâtre du Châtelet, including 14 by Balanchine.

Thanks to PBS and their Great Performances series, you can now get a taste of what it was like to be in that audience. The network will air the closing night performance in a two-part broadcast on February 17 (that's tonight!) and February 24, hosted by artistic director Peter Martins.

The lineup features four Balanchine works, all set to the music of French composers—and the casting alone is enough to make you want to tune in.

Keep reading... Show less
Views
Kyle Froman.

Who doesn't love a good behind-the-scenes video? As part of their new web series, American Doers, People magazine followed New York City Ballet's Amar Ramasar around for a day. For fans of the charismatic and vibrant (not to mention stylish) principal dancer, the video does not disappoint.

We see Ramasar coaching the series host, James Marshall, through a simple combination in the company's Lincoln Center studios; troubleshooting a challenging partnering sequence with fellow principal Sara Mearns in rehearsal; and getting physical therapy to ease the pain that comes with a 13-hour dance day. In these moments, we get an unfiltered glimpse into the daily goings-on of company life.

But the video doesn't only take us through Ramasar's typical schedule—through his words, it also gives insight into the drive and determination that propelled him to where he is today. Ramasar recounts his childhood in the Bronx, where "all the kids on my block wanted to be baseball players, basketball players, rappers...and I wanted to do ballet." He got a late start at age 12, and sometimes lied to friends about his love of dance to avoid being teased. A telling moment comes when he describes a conversation he had with his uncle, at age 15. "I asked my uncle what was the best ballet company in the world, and he told me the New York City Ballet," Ramasar says. "I told him, at that time, 'I'm gonna dance for that company.' "

It's one thing to be captivated by the performers we see onstage, but there's something equally thrilling about getting a sense of who they are in the studio, and the experiences that led them there. Check out the full video below:

For more news on all things ballet, don't miss a single issue.

Ballet Careers
"I am constantly intrigued by individuals and what makes people unique," says Schumacher. "Even when they're dancing together, you see seven very different people doing something." Photo by Kyle Froman for Pointe.

Troy Schumacher has been very busy.

The final days of September saw the New York City Ballet corps member rehearsing for a full slate of performances while simultaneously preparing the premiere of Common Ground, his second ballet for the company.

Schumacher's first work for NYCB, Clearing Dawn, was notable for its athleticism, high energy and refreshing youthfulness. Similarly, Common Ground is profoundly physical, with dancers exploding through the air in bursts of sissonnes and bounding over imaginary puddles with successive grands jetés. But in contrast, "the mood is a little darker, a little more mysterious," says NYCB soloist Ashley Laracey, who is also married to Schumacher.

Keep reading... Show less
Ballet Stars
Kyle Froman for Pointe

Even on a gray, rainy day in New York City, Amar Ramasar looks polished and put-together. But when he shops, he likes to make it quick. “Once I see something, I'm like 'Oh, maybe I don't even have to try this on!' " he says. The exception? Suits, which he'll often get tailored to ensure a perfect fit. “When the company went on tour to Hong Kong we found Baron Kay's Tailor"—a China-based company that often sends representatives overseas. “Every time they come to the city I'll try and catch them," he says. In his studio wear, warmth takes priority. “It's funny, I find myself wearing red in many ballets," he says, “and coincidentally, I wear a lot of red in rehearsal." For style inspiration, he looks to mentors like Jock Soto, Nikolaj Hübbe and Charles Askegard. “I've had the honor of growing up with all these great guys, and I've always admired the way they look," he says. “I think everybody in ballet is very fashionable!"

Keep reading... Show less
News

Megan Dickinson, Amar Ramasar and Amber Neff. Photo by Lois Greenfield

 

New York City Ballet principal Amar Ramasar may be in the middle of NYCB’s fall season, but during his free time you'll catch him dancing up a storm in an old Noho loft. That’s because he and nine other dancers have been preparing for “Voices of Bulgaria and America,” a series of performances October 17–19 at the 92nd Street Y, that brings together artists from both countries. The massive loft, which functions as part living space, part dance studio, belongs to quirky contemporary ballet choreographer Kathryn Posin, who developed the program with longtime collaborator Momchil Mladenov as a celebration of his native country. It also signals the resurrection of her project-based Kathryn Posin Dance Company, which she suspended in 1991 to pursue freelance choreography.

 

Three Bulgarian dancers currently dancing Stateside—Boston Ballet’s Boyko Dossev, The Suzanne Farrell Ballet’s Violeta Angelova and Louisville Ballet’s Philip Velinov—are slated to perform alongside Ramasar, the Joffrey Ballet’s Yumelia Garcia and Flesh and Bone’s Megan Dickinson, among others. The program includes three world premieres to scores by John Adams, Steve Reich and Bulgarian composer Emil Tabakov, as well as live music by Bulgarian double bassist Viktoria Tsvetkova. Click here for tickets and information.

News

 

Maria Kowrowski and Amar Ramasar in Herman Schmerman, photo by Paul Kolnik

 

When tickets go on sale for New York City Center’s annual Fall for Dance Festival on September 14, you might want to cancel your plans for the day—getting through to the box office can take hours, and before you know it, the shows are sold out! It’s no surprise as to why—tickets are a mere $15, with five programs of deliciously eclectic dance companies from around the world to choose from.

 

Luckily, the festival is offering a free sneak preview on September 12 and 13 at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park. New York City Ballet principals Maria Kowrowski and Amar Ramasar are slated to perform Herman Schmerman, a quirky duet choreographed by William Forsythe to an electronic score by longtime collaborator Thom Willems. Also on the program is Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, performing Nacho Duato’s Gnawa; Bend in the Road, a world premiere collaboration by Damian Woetzel and Memphis jookin’ extraordinaire Lil Buck; and Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company in D-Man in the Waters (Part I).

 

While the preview performances are free, you’ll still need tickets, which will be distributed two per person at the Delacorte Theatre on the day of the show and through virtual ticketing at shakespeareinthepark.org.

Senior editor Jenny Stahl recently called New York City Ballet principal Daniel Ulbricht "Superman," and I can't think of a better way to describe the phenomenally talented dancer and teacher, who seems to be everywhere at once these days. (We recently posted a poll asking who your favorite dancer-teacher was, and Ulbricht cleaned up.)

Now Ulbricht can add humanitarian to his already impressive resume: He and Erin Fogarty are producing "Dance Against Cancer," a benefit for The American Cancer Society, which will take place at Manhattan Movement and Arts Center this Monday, April 25. And you'd be hard-pressed to dream up a better program. Wendy Whelan and Craig Hall performing the gorgeous pas de deux from Christopher Wheeldon's "After the Rain"? Check. A ballet by golden-boy choreographer Benjamin Millepied? Check. Crazy-awesome contemporary troupe Keigwin + Company? Check. "So You Think You Can Dance" phenomenon Alex Wong? Check. A slew of other NYCB principals, including Janie Taylor, Tyler Angle, Robert Fairchild, Sterling Hyltin, Amar Ramasar, Maria Kowroski and, yes, Ulbricht himself? Check, check, check.

For tickets and more information, click here. Then visit cancer.org to learn about the invaluable work done by The American Cancer Society.

Sponsored

Viral Videos

Sponsored

mailbox

Get Pointe Magazine in your inbox

Sponsored

Win It!