Slipper Roundup

For such a seemingly simple shoe, the ballet slipper is available in a stunning variety of styles, colors and fabrics. Finding your favorite slippers requires choosing between full and split soles, and between canvas and leather. Look to different makers and models to find variations in softness, durability, vamp height and shape and amount of coverage of the foot. This list of manufacturers will help you get started. Unless stated otherwise, each company carries leather and canvas models in split sole and full sole.

Bloch
800-94-BLOCH
www.blochworld.com
Details: Men’s, women’s and children’s sizes; variety of styles and colors

Capezio/Ballet Makers, Inc.

800-533-1887
www.capeziodance.com
Details: Men’s, women’s and children’s sizes; variety of styles and colors

New in the last year: Satin Daisy in children’s and women’s sizes, with brushed poly/cotton lining; leather Cobra for men, women and children, in light pink.

Freed of London
866-MY-FREED
www.freedoflondon.com
Details: Men’s, women’s and children’s sizes; variety of styles and colors

New in the last year: Aspire in children’s and women’s sizes, a Royal Academy of Dance–approved full-sole slipper in peach leather and pink satin (canvas and other leather colors by special order).

Fuzi International
888-368-6255
www.fuzi.net
Details: Men’s, women’s and children’s sizes in canvas and leather, split sole; variety of colors

Gamba
800-858-5855
Details: Men’s and women’s sizes in canvas or leather split sole and leather full sole; black and salmon

Grishko
800-474-7454
www.grishko.com
Details: Men’s, women’s and children’s sizes in canvas or leather split sole; variety of colors

Karl-Heinz Martin

36-84-887-201
www.martin-ballettschuhe.com
Details: Men’s, women’s and children’s sizes; variety of styles and colors

New in the last year: The new Karl-Heinz Martin M001 is an asymmetrical slipper (left and right feet) made in stretch canvas fabric for conformity to the foot; available in black and white.

Leo’s Dancewear
800-736-LEOS
www.leosdancewear.com
Details: Men’s, women’s and children’s sizes; variety of styles and colors

New in the last year: All styles feature drawstring sewn in place at back of slipper.

Liberts
800-624-6480
www.liberts.com
Details: Women’s and children’s sizes in leather split or full sole; variety of colors

Main Street Dancewear

800-888-8496
www.mainstreetdancewear.com
Details: Women’s and children’s sizes in leather split or full sole; variety of colors

Merlet
800-660-6818
www.merletusa.com
Details: Men’s and women’s sizes; variety of styles and colors

Mondor, Ltd.

800-363-1952
www.mondor.com

Details: Men’s, women’s and children’s sizes in leather split or full sole; pink and black

Prima Soft
800-431-6005
www.prima-soft.com
Details: Men’s, women’s and children’s sizes; variety of styles and colors in split soles and hourglass-shaped full soles

Principal By Chan Hon Goh, Inc.
604-688-6836
www.principalshoes.com
Details: Men’s, women’s and children’s sizes in canvas full or split sole; variety of colors

New in the last year: Flesh color in split-sole slipper.

Repetto

800-858-5855
www.repetto.com
Details: Men’s, women’s and children’s sizes; variety of styles and colors

Russian Pointe

866-R-POINTE
www.russianpointe.com
Details: Men’s, women’s and children’s sizes in canvas full or split sole; variety of colors

New in the last year: Virtuoso, a canvas split-sole slipper for adults with no outer heel, but extra padding on the inside.

Sansha
212-246-6212
www.sansha.com
Details: Men’s, women’s and children’s sizes; variety of styles and colors

New in the last year: The Pro leather model is now available in black.

Só Dança

800-269-5033
www.sodanca.com
Details: Men’s, women’s and children’s sizes; variety of styles and colors

Trimfoot Co., Inc.
800-325-6116
www.trimfootco.com
Details: Women’s and children’s sizes; variety of styles and colors

New in the last year: Stretch Ballet for women, a split-sole slipper featuring an all-Lycra upper; smaller children’s sizes have been added to the Satin Ballet slipper.

Jennifer Brewer is a dancer, teacher and freelance writer based in Saco, Maine.

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