Matthew Karas for Dance Magazine

How Rock Climbing Makes Atlanta Ballet's Rachel Van Buskirk a Stronger Dancer

This story originally appeared in the April/May 2016 issue of Pointe.

Om at home: Three days a week, Van Buskirk spends about 20 minutes waking up with yoga. “I build muscle easily," she says, “so I like to balance it out by stretching and lengthening." She moves through sun salutations and warrior poses to get her heart rate up but pauses when her body needs a deeper stretch. “If my psoas is sore, I usually hold my lunges." Yoga's breathing techniques also help her connect with her breath during demanding choreography.

Stability secret: “My left knee has been giving me problems, so I do a lot of stabilizing work," she says. Between allégro combinations, she builds strength around the joint with this exercise: Standing in parallel with one leg in a turned-in passé, she slowly lowers into a lunge and tries to touch the ground with her hand before returning to standing. The focus is on tracking the standing knee with correct alignment.


Outdoor action: Van Buskirk admits that the gym bores her. “I prefer outdoor activities like walking, biking and swimming." Each time she hits the pool, she tries to swim at least one lap farther than she did previously to build stamina. “And anytime I have an excuse to hike in the woods, I'll take it."

Van Buskirk in "Hamlet." Photo by C. McCullers, Courtesy Atlanta Ballet.

Scaling walls: She enjoys indoor rock climbing with a group of fellow Atlanta Ballet dancers. “That is some cardio," she says. “You don't realize it until you're halfway up a wall and every muscle is shaking. You're breathing so heavy and holding on for dear life. It's exhilarating." She relishes climbing for its similarities to dance, including the subtle weight shifts, whole-body coordination and problem solving.

Backstage elixir: When she's in the theater, Van Buskirk always has a local cold-pressed juice made of pineapple, cranberry, ginger and lemon—called a Hot Shot—which she adds chia seeds to for a pre-performance boost. “The seeds help with long periods of energy and fullness," she says.

Nighttime stretching: Van Buskirk winds down by foam-rolling her muscles and releasing her IT bands with slow stretches from yin yoga. “As dancers, we often approach stretching aggressively," she says. “Instead of pushing through pain in 20 seconds, I let it happen passively over a few minutes. It gets into the deep connective tissue, and the difference is amazing."

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