Competitors in class. Gregory Bartadon, Courtesy Prix de Lausanne.

Live Stream the 2019 Prix de Lausanne All Week (with More Hours Available Than Ever Before)

Prepare to give up your plans for this entire week. The 2019 Prix de Lausanne is underway, with more hours of streaming available than ever before. Bunheads and balletomanes can enjoy up to six hours a day of free streaming live from Switzerland.

The broadcast started this morning with the junior category girls running through their classical variations onstage for the first time, followed by the senior boys in contemporary class. The full schedule for the week is available here, and streaming can be viewed on ARTE Concert or on the Prix de Lausanne website. (The ARTE Concert site is in French, but don't let that deter you; the stream itself is all in English.)


Yesterday, 75 young dancers hailing from 19 different countries (including 10 competitors from the U.S.) gathered in Lausanne, Switzerland, for the 47th edition of the Prix. They'll spend this week in ballet and contemporary classes and coaching sessions before performing before the nine member jury on Friday for a chance to compete in the finals. Both the selections and finals will be streamed in their entirety. This year's jury is headed by 1990 Prix de Lausanne gold medal winner Carlos Acosta and also includes Ivan Gil-Ortega, Julio Bocca, Gillian Murphy, Madeleine Onne, Garry Trinder, Eric Vu-An, Samuel Wuersten and Miyako Yoshida.

The nine member jury with associate director Kathryn Bradney (sixth from left)

Gregory Bartadon, Courtesy Prix de Lausanne

Viewers at home have the chance to help support competitors by donating to the Prix's online crowdfunding campaign and voting for their favorite finalist. The sum raised will be split between the Audience Favorite Prize Winner and the Web Audience Favorite Prize Winner to help them pay for the next phase of their careers.

So settle in and stay tuned; we'll keep you posted on all things Prix de Lausanne, all week.

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