Ballet Stars

Meet the 2018 Princess Grace Award Winners

Pennsylvania Ballet's Sydney Dolan in rehearsal for The Nutcracker. Photo by Arian Molina Soca, Courtesy PAB.

Each year, the Princess Grace Foundation, honoring the legacy of Princess Grace Kelly of Monaco, offers awards to distinguished artists spanning the fields of theater, film and, of course, dance. The 2018 winners were just announced and include nine dancers and choreographers, five of whom—Sydney Dolan, Catherine Hurlin, David Adrian Freeland, Dana Genshaft and Claudia Schreier—hail from the ballet world. In addition to this list, choreographer Kyle Abraham received a Statue Award, recognizing his success since winning the Princess Grace Award in 2010. We can't wait to see Abraham's first-ever work for a ballet company at New York City Ballet's fashion gala this fall.

We've included more info on the ballet-affiliated winners below. Dance awards outside of the ballet realm go to Juilliard School student Matthew Gilmore, New York University student Aliza Russell, Abraham.in.Motion dancer Marcella Lewis and Gibney Dance Company member Shamel Pitts. You can read more about all of the awardees here.


Sydney Dolan: Dance Fellowship 2018, Chris Hellman Dance Award

Sydney Dolan in Balanchine's "Rubies." Photo by Arian Molina Soca, Courtesy PAB.

Sydney Dolan is a corps de ballet dancer with Pennsylvania Ballet. She's steadily climbed the company ranks since joining PBII in 2016. Though the 2018/2019 season is her first in the corps, she's already danced the Pas de Trois in Angel Corella's Swan Lake, the Lilac Fairy in The Sleeping Beauty, Dew Drop in George Balanchine's The Nutcracker and the Tall Girl in Balanchine's "Rubies."

Catherine Hurlin: Dance Fellowship 2018, Barbara & John Lehman Dance Award

Catherine Hurlin (center) with Dunan Lyle and Roman Zhurbin in Alexei Ratmansky's Whipped Cream. Photo by Doug Gifford, Courtesy ABT.

This has been a big summer for American Ballet Theatre's Catherline Hurlin; last month, she was promoted to soloist. Since joining ABT as an apprentice in 2013, Hurlin has shone in a number of featured roles including Young Clara in Alexei Ratmansky's The Nutcracker and the hilarious Mademoiselle Marianne Chartreuse in Ratmansky's Whipped Cream—both of which she originated.

David Adrian Freeland: Dance Fellowship 2018

David Adrian Freeland with Jacquelin Harris in Katarzyna Skarpetowska's Cuore Sott'olio for Ailey II. Photo by Eduardo Patino, Courtesy AAADT.

L.A. Dance Project member David Adrian Freeland danced with The Metropolitan Opera and Missouri Ballet Theatre before joining the California-based contemporary company in 2016. While with L.A. Dance Project he's danced in works by founder Benjamin Millepied and Justin Peck as well as modern classics by Martha Graham, Merce Cunningham and many others.

Dana Genshaft: Choreography Fellowship 2018

Dana Genshaft in San Francisco Ballet's production of Alexei Ratmansky's Foreign Lands. Photo by Erik Tomasson, Courtesy SFB.

Former San Francisco Ballet soloist Dana Genshaft began choreographing in 2014, creating work for companies such as the American Ballet Theatre Studio Company and SFDanceworks as well as movement for dance films and music videos. Her work often tends towards the interdisciplinary: Most recently she partnered with musician Thomas Lauderdale to develop a ballet based on a 1929 children's novel. She has been commissioned to create for The Washington Ballet's spring 2019 season.

Claudia Schreier: Choreography Fellowship 2018

Claudia Schreier in rehearsal with students at Ballet Academy East. Photo by Rosalie O'Connor, Courtesy Schreier.

Claudia Schreier earned her B.A. from Harvard University before making a name for herself as a choreographer. She's been commissioned to make work for the Vail Dance Festival, Joffrey Winning Works, the American Ballet Theatre Studio Company, Dance Theatre of Harlem and more. In 2017 her troupe, Claudia Schreier & Company, made its Joyce Theater Debut. You can follow her experience in this documentary.

Summer Intensive Survival
Getty Images

There's a sweet spot toward the end of August—after summer intensives have wrapped up and before it's time to head back to school or work—where the days are long, lazy and begging to be spent neck-deep in a pile of good books. Whether you're looking for inspiration for the upcoming season or trying to brush up on your dance history, you can never go wrong with an excellent book on ballet. We've gathered eight titles (all available at common booksellers like Amazon and Barnes and Noble) guaranteed to give you a deeper understanding of the art form, to add to your end-of-summer reading list.

Keep reading... Show less
Site Network
James Yoichi Moore and Noelani Pantastico warm up onstage. Angela Sterling, Courtesy SDC.

On a sunny July weekend, hundreds of Seattle-area dance fans converged on tiny Vashon Island, a bucolic enclave in Puget Sound about 20 miles from the city. They made the ferry trek to attend the debut performance of the fledgling Seattle Dance Collective.

SDC is not a run-of-the-mill contemporary dance company; it's the brainchild of two of Pacific Northwest Ballet's most respected principal dancers: James Yoichi Moore and Noelani Pantastico. The duo wanted to create a nimble organization to feature dancers and choreographers they felt needed more exposure in the Pacific Northwest.

Keep reading... Show less
News
Roman Mejia in Robbins' Dances at a Gathering. Erin Baiano, Courtesy NYCB.

The Princess Grace Foundation has just announced its 2019 class, and we're thrilled that two ballet dancers—New York City Ballet's Roman Mejia and BalletX's Stanley Glover—are included among the list of über-talented actors, filmmakers, playwrights, dancers and choreographers.

Keep reading... Show less
Trending
The Royal Ballet's Alexander Campbell and Yasmine Naghdi in Ashton's The Two Pigeons. Tristram Kenton, Courtesy ROH.

While most ballet casts are 100 percent human, it's not unheard of for live animals to appear onstage, providing everything from stage dressing to supporting roles. Michael Messerer's production of Don Quixote features a horse and a donkey; American Ballet Theatre's Giselle calls for two Russian wolfhounds; and Sir Frederick Ashton's La Fille Mal Gardee requires a white Shetland pony. Another Ashton masterpiece, The Two Pigeons, is well known for its animal actors. But though ballet is a highly disciplined, carefully choreographed art form, some performers are naturally more prone to flights of fancy—because they're birds.

Keep reading... Show less