Results of a recent study published in the journal Psychological Bulletin found that millennials are the generation most predisposed to perfectionism. Factor in a serious study of ballet—constantly critiquing your movements in the mirror and dealing with strict instructors and talented competition—and you've only upped the ante.


So why is the present generation at risk of falling into the perfectionist trap? The study pinpoints increasing competitiveness, pressure to find high-paying jobs and heavy social media usage as possible reasons. While striving for excellence is a well-intentioned goal, if that behavior turns obsessive, it can be detrimental to your well-being and overall enjoyment of dance. Here's how to avoid three common pitfalls of perfectionism:

Set Incremental Goals for Yourself

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Instead of comparing your achievements to other dancers'

Try channeling that energy into smaller-scale goals you set for yourself, like adding another revolution to your pirouettes.

Trade Screen Time for Face Time

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Instead of using free time to gush over seemingly perfect dancers on Instagram

Try limiting your daily social media usage. Spend some of that time connecting with your friends face-to-face, outside of the studio.

Recognize Your Own Achievements

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Instead of telling yourself you're not as talented as everyone else

Try recognizing personal accomplishments and allowing yourself to feel proud.

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