San Francisco Ballet principal Frances Chung with her dressing room pal, Iggy. Photo by Erik Tomasson, Courtesy SFB.

Good Luck Charms and Makeup Must-Haves: Inside 3 Ballerinas' Dressing Rooms

A dancer's dressing room is often her "home away from home." We went backstage with Boston Ballet principal Lia Cirio, San Francisco Ballet principal Frances Chung and Richmond Ballet dancer Cody Beaton to see how they personalize their space and get performance-ready.


Lia Cirio, Boston Ballet

Photo courtesy Cirio.

Pre-show routine: "I don't like to be rushed," says Boston Ballet principal Lia Cirio. She usually does her hair and makeup an hour and a half before curtain so that she has time to warm up. Before she goes onstage, she says a little prayer, then checks her ribbons "incessantly" to make sure they're secure.

Frances Chung, San Francisco Ballet

Photo by Erik Tomasson, courtesy SFB.

Pre-performance routine: Chung likes to get to the theater two and a half hours early, and does much of her makeup before class for matinees. "I don't necessarily need all that time, but it helps get me in the mood. That's more important to me now, to focus on what I'm going to perform."

Cody Beaton, Richmond Ballet

Photo courtesy Richmond Ballet.

Pre-performance routine: Beaton gets to the theater an hour before class. Afterwards, she does her hair and makeup and then a 15-minute Pilates/barre warm-up. "It's the exact same barre every time. It's timed really well, so it gets me sweating and warm and ready to go do anything."

This article first appeared in the August/September 2017 issue of Pointe.

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