Courtesy New York City Center

Watch Misty Copeland, Sara Mearns and Tiler Peck Being Coached Live in NYCC's New Online Series

Have you ever wished you could pull back the curtain and watch some of our country's most beloved ballerinas being coached?

With the coronavirus pandemic keeping theaters closed for the foreseeable future, NYCC has moved its popular Studio 5 lecture/demonstration series online. Starting July 16, NYCC is launching a special 5-part event titled Great American Ballerinas. The series will feature live footage of primas Misty Copeland, Sara Mearns and Tiler Peck being coached remotely by acclaimed dance artists including Nina Ananiashvili, Merrill Ashley, Alessandra Ferri, Stephanie Saland and Pam Tanowitz. The sessions will also include performance excerpts and live interviews facilitated by critic and historian Alastair Macaulay, who's curating and hosting the series.


Each video will be available for free on NYCC's YouTube channel and website for one week. After that, NYCC members will be able to access the full archive. "During these uncertain and turbulent times, it is even more important that City Center provides a platform for artists to develop and share their work," says NYCC president and CEO Arlene Shuler. "I'm excited that City Center Live @ Home programming showcases some of the extraordinary dance artists who are part of our extended family."

So pull out your calendars, and get ready for an unprecedented look at the stars at work. The full Great American Ballerinas schedule is available below.

Thursday, July 16 at 3 pm EDT

The series starts out strong with New York City Ballet principal Tiler Peck being coached by former NYCB star and ballet master Merrill Ashley. The duo will explore a selection of Balanchine solos.

Thursday, July 30 at 12 pm EDT 

Watch two ballerinas known for the dual role of Odette-Odile explore Swan Lake's iconic protagonist: The series' second installment features international star and State Ballet of Georgia artistic director Nina Ananiashvili coaching NYCB principal Sara Mearns.

Wednesday, September 16 at 5 pm EDT 

Peck returns alongside former NYCB dancer Stephanie Saland to dive into the world of Jerome Robbins. Saland will work with Peck on the "green solo" from Dances at a Gathering, a role Robbins himself coached her in.

Wednesday, September 23 at 5 pm EDT

Here, Mearns will delve into her postmodern side with choreographer Pam Tanowitz to explore newly created solo material.

Wednesday, September 30 at 5 pm EDT

The final installment of the series will feature American Ballet Theatre principal Misty Copeland working with prima ballerina Alessandra Ferri on Juliet's Act III solo scenes from Kenneth MacMillan's Romeo and Juliet.

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