Richmond Ballet dancers show off two adoptable shelter dogs at its annual "Pupcracker." Photo courtesy Richmond Ballet

These Party Scene Puppies Need a Good Home

If you're looking to upstage Clara, there's no better way to do it than with a four-legged furry friend—especially when that furry friend is looking for its forever home. Cue Richmond Ballet: During its December 16 and 21 matinees, the company is teaming up with the Richmond SPCA to present the "Pupcracker," special Nutcracker performances featuring adoptable shelter dogs. Several pups make their stage debut during the party scene as the guests bring their family pets to and from the Silberhaus home. Audience members can then meet—and adopt—the dogs during intermission and after the performance. The SPCA even provides a crate, collar, leash and treats so that patrons can bring their new family members home after the show.


Audience members can meet and adopt featured dogs during intermission. Photo Courtesy Richmond Ballet.


Artistic director Stoner Winslett first reached out to SPCA CEO Robin Starr, a former Richmond Ballet board president and current trustee emerita, about partnering up seven years ago. Since then the company has presented 17 "Pupcracker" performances, resulting in 34 adoptions. "I think 'Pupcracker' has been very successful not only in getting dogs adopted on site, but also in raising awareness about shelter pets," says Winslett, who has rescued five SPCA dogs herself over the years.


Artistic director Stoner Winslett (far right) backstage with Richmond Ballet dancers and an SPCA featured dog. Photo courtesy Richmond Ballet

Richmond Ballet isn't the only company partnering up with local animal shelters. Fort Wayne Ballet and Sacramento Ballet have hosted similar adoption events during their Nutcracker productions. We really hope this trend catches on!

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