Rudolf Nureyev. Courtesy Spotlight Cinema Networks.

Nureyev on the Big Screen: A New Documentary Hits Theaters This Month

What's better than one film about Rudolf Nureyev? Two films about Rudolf Nureyev!

We're excited to share that a feature-length documentary titled Nureyev is slated to make its North American premiere this month. Nureyev will be shown in major U.S. cities starting April 19, giving you just enough time time to brush up on your Nureyev history before the Ralph Fiennes directed biopic, The White Crow, hits U.S. theaters on April 26.


Created with the support of The Nureyev Foundation and co-directed by Jacqui Morris and David Morris, Nureyev traces the celebrated dancer's ascent from humble beginnings in Russia to international fame at the Kirov Ballet to his defection to the West at the height of the Cold War, contextualizing his story in the cultural and political tensions of the time. If the trailer is any indication, we can look forward to plenty of dance footage; the film also promises never-before-seen clips of Nureyev in works by modern dancemakers Martha Graham, Paul Taylor and Murray Lewis as well as exclusive modern dance tableaux directed by choreographer Russell Maliphant.

Narrated by Welsh actress Dame Siân Phillips, the documentary includes contributions from many of Nureyev's ballet contemporaries, including Kirov star Alla Osipenko, Paris Opéra prima Ghislaine Thesmar and Royal Ballet principal Dame Antoinette Sibley as well as interviews with a handful of dance historians and some of Nureyev's personal friends. "Dance, unlike most other art forms, is ephemeral," says Jacqui Morris in a statement. "Our responsibility was to save Rudolf Nureyev for future generations, by tracking down the best of his work that survives on film, and then present it—and him—in the context of his time."

Nureyev will be shown in U.S. cities including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco, Boston, San Diego, Denver, Minneapolis, St. Louis and Washington, DC starting April 19. Let the countdown begin!

Latest Posts


James Barkley, Courtesy Dance for Change

Take Class From Celebrated Black Dancers and Raise Money for the NAACP Through Dance for Change

Since the nationwide fight against racial inequality took center stage in May, organizations across the dance world have been looking for meaningful ways to show their support, rather than fall back on empty social media signifiers. July 10-11, Diamante Ballet Dancewear is taking action with Dance for Change, a two-day event dedicated to fundraising for the NAACP, and amplifying the voices of Black professional dancers.

Organized by Diamante Ballet Dancewear's founder, Nashville Ballet 2 dancer Isichel Perez, and Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre teacher Elise Gillum, Dance for Change makes it easy to participate. Dancers need only to make a donation to the NAACP (in any amount) and email proof to diamante.ballet@gmail.com to be given online access to a full schedule of Zoom master classes taught by Black pros artists. Teachers include Ballet Memphis' George Sanders, Boston Ballet's Daniel Durrett, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre's Corey Bourbonniere, and more. "It's important that we amplify BIPOC voices during this time, and it's also important that we're conscious of where we're putting our dollars," says Bourbonniere. "Diamante is doing both with Dance for Change, and I'm honored to be in this talented group of melanated dancers."

Keep reading SHOW LESS

Houston Ballet's "Dancing With Myself" Captures How We All Feel Right Now

What are dancers to do when they're still stuck at home in isolation? After all, there's only so much time you can spend taking barre, tackling your reading list (or Netflix queue) or ticking items off your to-do list. Even wistfully looking out the window has lost its appeal after a few months.

That's when you need a dance party—even it's for a party of one.

Keep reading SHOW LESS
Getty Images

"Our Studio Is Failing Its Students of Color": One Dancer's Experience of Racism and Microaggressions

I recently spent a Saturday night with my husband and my 17-year-old dancing daughter, who sobbed at the foot of our bed. My daughter revealed her experiences with implicit bias and overt racism in school, and especially in the dance studio.

For six years, she has danced at a classical ballet school tied to the city's ballet company. The previous six years were spent at a mid-sized recreational/competition studio. I want to recount a few examples of the racism that my daughter shared that night.

Keep reading SHOW LESS

Editors' Picks