San Francisco Ballet's Frances Chung in "Coppelia." Photo by Erik Tomasson, courtesy SFB.

Celebrate National Best Friend Day With Our 5 Favorite Ballet BFFs

Though you may not know it, June 8 is National Best Friends Day. Obviously this provides an opportunity to celebrate some of our favorite friendships in ballet, but maybe not the kind you're thinking of. Instead of rounding up our favorite real-life besties (hi, ABT Cindies), we're taking a look at some of ballet's onstage friendships. While lots of classical ballets include love triangles with characters tearing each other down, there are some occasions where friendship flourishes. Check out some of our favorites below, and don't forget to wish your studio BFFs a happy National Best Friends Day!

Romeo, Mercutio and Benvolio, Romeo & Juliet

Pacific Northwest Ballet principal dancers Benjamin Griffiths (Benvolio), James Moore (Romeo), and Jonathan Porretta (Mercutio) in Jean-Christophe Maillot's "Roméo et Juliette." Photo by Angela Sterling, Courtesy PNB.

Sure, Juliet has her nurse, but Mercutio literally duels to his death against Tybalt for his BFF Romeo—talk about a loyal friend. But before all of the drama unfolds, Romeo, Mercutio and Benvolio were just your average besties, sneaking into parties and hanging out at the marketplace.


Four Little Swans, Swan Lake

Pacific Northwest Ballet corps de ballet dancers Carli Samuelson and Madison Rayn Abeo, and soloists Angelica Generosa and Leta Biasucci in Kent Stowell's "Swan Lake." Photo by Angela Sterling, Courtesy PNB.

These ladies are the original clique. Not only are they attached at the hip, they're completely in sync all the time, from the tilt of their heads to their precise footwork.

Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, Don Quixote

Pacific Northwest Ballet guest artists Tom Skerritt (Don Q) and Allen Galli (Sancho Panza) with company dancers in Alexei Ratmansky's "Don Quixote." Photo by Angela Sterling, Courtesy PNB.

While ballets are filled with all manner of trusty sidekicks, there is no one quite as idealistic and optimistic in his commitment to his pal as Sancho Panza is to Don Quixote. Even though Don Q may be dreaming of a more beautiful companion, they're content to spend their days adventuring together.

Myrtha's Sidekick Wilis, Giselle

Pacific Northwest Ballet principal dancers Elizabeth Murphy and Sarah Ricard Orza in Peter Boal's staging of "Giselle." Photo by Angela Sterling, Courtesy PNB.

Even in death, Moyna and Zulma are BFFs, helping Myrtha round up the rest of the Wilis. While some might say the Wilis are a little coldhearted given that they spend their nights dancing men to death, we think M and Z's friendship proves otherwise (plus, most of those guys probably deserved it).

Swanilda's Crew, Coppélia

San Francisco Ballet's Frances Chung in "Coppelia." Photo by Erik Tomasson, courtesy SFB.

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Ask yourself this: If your BFF found a key lying outside someone's house, would you be down to follow her inside? After all, this is an act better known as breaking and entering. Basically, what we're getting at is that Swanilda's friends must really love her if they're willing to get into those sorts of shenanigans.

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