Misty Copeland works with a MindLeaps student in Kigali, Rwanda last week. Photo Courtesy MindLeaps.

Watch Misty Copeland's Vlogs From Her Most Recent Trip to Rwanda with MindLeaps

In 2015, Misty Copeland travelled to Kigali, Rwanda with MindLeaps, an international NGO that uses dance to help at-risk youth develop life skills. Up until that point, the program had only been available to boys; Copeland's visit launched MindLeaps' Girls Program. Now, three years later, Copeland's just back from another trip week-long to Kigali.

MindLeaps does more than just teach dance. The organization uses free classes to draw vulnerable youth, many of whom are orphaned and living on the street, to safe spaces within urban slums. Once they're regularly attending dance classes, children are enrolled in programs in digital literacy, nutrition support, sanitation services, sexual and reproductive health, and academic catch-up classes. Eventually, the participants go on to boarding schools or to work-study positions, breaking the poverty cycle. "When you learn about the [Rwandan] genocide, you see how strong people had to be to survive. When you look at these kids today, you can see their resilience. Those are themes of my life too—to overcome all odds to succeed," Copeland told Pointe via email. Copeland's work with MindLeaps expands behind her visits to Rwanda; through her ongoing work with their International Artists Fund she works to represent the organization in the U.S. In 2015, she also founded a scholarship to send a promising student, Ali, to boarding school.


MindLeaps created a series of vlogs following Copeland's time in Kigali. Scroll through the videos below to see glimpses of Copeland teaching class and working with MindLeaps alumnae, as well as updates from Ali and Copeland's thoughts after visiting the Murambi Genocide Memorial. Plus, there are plenty of heart-warming shots of Copeland with adorable young dancers in training.

Day 1: Misty Copeland Returns to Rwanda

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