Misa’s Latest Bulletin from Spain: Beaches, Big Stages, and “Princessas”!

I’m now in Las Palmas and writing to you from the pool at the hotel. We had our first free day today!

This past week we’ve been in San Sebastían and Santander. We were in both cities for only two days and they went by so quickly! It was chilly in both but there were incredible beaches. I danced in all of the performances so I was very busy.

One thing about touring is the challenge of being in different theatres each week. In Barcelona the stage was smaller than what we are used to, so we had to make some adjustments to our performances. San Sebastían we had a big stage again, and it felt wonderful. We also did in Santander, and I felt real freedom in my movement on that stage.

San Sebastían was beautiful and a change from Barcelona. It’s a smaller city; the hotel was great and the theatre beautiful. The dressing rooms had amazing chairs that were so comfortable to lie on. I wish I could take them back to my apartment!

On the last day in San Sebastian, as we were leaving, I was pulling my suitcase behind me when the handle broke. I yelled for James Whiteside to help me and he came to my rescue (Thank you James!).

On both nights in Santander I went to a restaurant, La Sal. It was by the water and the restaurant was really amazing—and a good way to end two long days. Our waiter was very nice, he explained to Rie Ichikawa and me every single item in English and he called us ‘princessas’! It was delicious food—the best I’ve had so far!

I’ve received some mail from some new Spanish fans, which is exciting. It’s so nice to hear from audience members who enjoyed the performance.

Yesterday we traveled again, with two flights—to Madrid and then to Las Palmas. A delay in Madrid made things interesting but surprisingly we all just read and relaxed. Now on to two performances in Las Palmas (I’ll dance Rubies tonight!) and hopefully some sun in between!

 

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