Rachel Papo for Pointe.

NYCB's Miriam Miller Finds Her Wardrobe Staples While Touring With the Company

New York City Ballet's Miriam Miller prefers a pared-down look when she's not onstage or on the runway. The corps member and DNA Management model has established her own off-duty uniform, often made up of various items from her travels. "When we're on tour, I'll get something at a consignment shop just to have a little memory of being in a new city," Miller says, adding that she buys most of her clothes from consignment and thrift stores. Though she doesn't stick to any particular brands, Miller does have a few favorite styles, like her high-waisted bell-bottoms. "I like the way the relaxed flare looks," she explains, "plus, they're more comfortable than skinny jeans after a show. And color-wise, I like neutrals with an accessory pop of light pink or purple or blue."


In the studio, Miller wears the basics—a leotard and cutoff tights to see her lines better—but she keeps them bold. "I really love patterns and florals because when you're just in a leotard and tights every day, it's nice to have something more fun." Rather than layer on warm-ups, Miller prefers to arrive at the studio a half-hour before class to run through some Pilates exercises. "And I like to wear jewelry in class," she adds. "I love a dangly earring! And I always have on these two rings from my parents, and a bracelet from my best friend at the School of American Ballet who moved to Germany."


Rachel Papo

The Details—Street

UNIQLO jacket: "They have rather inexpensive puffer jackets, and I like that it has a bow at the waistband you can tie for a more fitted look," says Miller.
Club Monaco sweater: "Most of my sweaters are from Club Monaco—I wear a lot of cream and white with a colored or black pant."
Flare jeans: "I found these M.i.h. Jeans at a thrift store, but I also really like Alice & Olivia, and Paige tend to fit me well, too."
Puma sneakers: "I have a lot of Puma sneakers, and I pretty much wear them every day."


Rachel Papo

The Details—Studio

Elevé Dancewear leotard: "I did a shoot for them a few months ago," says Miller. "They're all about prints—you can even customize them—and they're really comfy."
Michael Kors bag: Miller likes to double her designer purse as a dance bag. "I have a shoe bag that I keep inside of it," she says. "I treat myself to a nice bag each year."
Freed of London pointe shoes: "This year, I finally settled on the exact shoe I wanted, and I'm really happy with them," says Miller of her Neptune maker shoes.

Latest Posts


Left to right: Dance Theatre of Harlem's Daphne Lee, Amanda Smith, Lindsey Donnell and Alexandra Hutchinson in a scene from Dancing Through Harlem. Derek Brockington, Courtesy Dance Theatre of Harlem

Dancers Share Their Key Takeaways After a Year of Dancing on Film

Creating dances specifically for film has become one of the most effective ways that ballet companies have connected with audiences and kept dancers employed during the pandemic. Around the world, dance organizations are finding opportunities through digital seasons, whether conceiving cinematic, site-specific pieces or filming works within a traditional theater. And while there is a consistent sentiment that nothing will ever substitute the thrill of a live show, dancers are embracing this new way of performing.

Keep reading SHOW LESS

#TBT: Mikhail Baryshnikov in "Fancy Free" (1981)

In Jerome Robbins's 1944 ballet Fancy Free, three sailors on leave spend the day at a bar, attempting to woo two young women by out-dancing and out-charming one another. In this clip from 1981, Mikhail Baryshnikov, who was then both the artistic director of American Ballet Theatre and a leading performer with the company, pulls out all the stops to win the ladies' affections.

Keep reading SHOW LESS
Bethany Kirby, Courtesy Tulsa Ballet

An Infectious-Disease Physician on What Vaccines Mean for Ballet

As the coronavirus pandemic grinds into its second year, the toll on ballet companies—and dancers—has been steep. How long before dancers can rehearse and perform as they once did?

Like most things, the return to normal for ballet seems to hinge on vaccinations. Just over 22 percent of people in the U.S. are now vaccinated, a way from the estimated 70 to 85 percent experts believe can bring back something similar to pre-pandemic life.

But what would it mean for 100 percent of a ballet company to be vaccinated? Tulsa Ballet artistic director Marcello Angelini is about to find out—and hopes it brings the return of big ballets on the big stage.

"I don't think companies like ours can survive doing work for eight dancers in masks," Angelini says. "If we want to work, dance, and be in front of an audience consistently and with the large works that pay the bills, immunization is the only road that leads there."

Keep reading SHOW LESS

Editors' Picks