Rachel Papo for Pointe.

NYCB's Miriam Miller Finds Her Wardrobe Staples While Touring With the Company

New York City Ballet's Miriam Miller prefers a pared-down look when she's not onstage or on the runway. The corps member and DNA Management model has established her own off-duty uniform, often made up of various items from her travels. "When we're on tour, I'll get something at a consignment shop just to have a little memory of being in a new city," Miller says, adding that she buys most of her clothes from consignment and thrift stores. Though she doesn't stick to any particular brands, Miller does have a few favorite styles, like her high-waisted bell-bottoms. "I like the way the relaxed flare looks," she explains, "plus, they're more comfortable than skinny jeans after a show. And color-wise, I like neutrals with an accessory pop of light pink or purple or blue."


In the studio, Miller wears the basics—a leotard and cutoff tights to see her lines better—but she keeps them bold. "I really love patterns and florals because when you're just in a leotard and tights every day, it's nice to have something more fun." Rather than layer on warm-ups, Miller prefers to arrive at the studio a half-hour before class to run through some Pilates exercises. "And I like to wear jewelry in class," she adds. "I love a dangly earring! And I always have on these two rings from my parents, and a bracelet from my best friend at the School of American Ballet who moved to Germany."


Rachel Papo

The Details—Street

UNIQLO jacket: "They have rather inexpensive puffer jackets, and I like that it has a bow at the waistband you can tie for a more fitted look," says Miller.
Club Monaco sweater: "Most of my sweaters are from Club Monaco—I wear a lot of cream and white with a colored or black pant."
Flare jeans: "I found these M.i.h. Jeans at a thrift store, but I also really like Alice & Olivia, and Paige tend to fit me well, too."
Puma sneakers: "I have a lot of Puma sneakers, and I pretty much wear them every day."


Rachel Papo

The Details—Studio

Elevé Dancewear leotard: "I did a shoot for them a few months ago," says Miller. "They're all about prints—you can even customize them—and they're really comfy."
Michael Kors bag: Miller likes to double her designer purse as a dance bag. "I have a shoe bag that I keep inside of it," she says. "I treat myself to a nice bag each year."
Freed of London pointe shoes: "This year, I finally settled on the exact shoe I wanted, and I'm really happy with them," says Miller of her Neptune maker shoes.

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