Michaela DePrince Is the New Face of Chase Bank

Did anyone else do a double take while watching the Grammys on Sunday? As in, was that Michaela DePrince leaping across my TV screen during a Chase commercial? Well, the answer is yes. The Dutch National Ballet soloist and best-selling author now joins the likes of pro athletes Serena Williams and Stephen Curry in the bank's ad campaign promoting its QuickPay Mobile App.


The commercial, named "Michaela's Way," shows DePrince soaring high above the heads of two dreamy pianists (playing a tongue-in-cheek version of Miley Cyrus' "Wrecking Ball"). The voiceover announces that DePrince can transfer money to practically anyone with the bank's mobile app, "all while performing a grand jeté between two grand pianos." It then cuts to DePrince and her sister Mia lounging in front of the television: "In real life she uses it to pay her sister from her couch, for the sweater she stained."

DePrince, a hero in the dance world for her inspirational journey from war orphan to professional dancer, is increasingly breaking into mainstream culture through her endorsements (like this one with Jockey), her profile on "Sunday Night with Megyn Kelly", her glamorous stint in Beyoncé's "Lemonade" video and her viral TEDx Talk. She's also been a tireless ambassador for War Child Holland, an organization that provides education, psychosocial support and protection to children whose lives have been affected by war. DePrince, who's been recovering from an Achilles tendon rupture over the last few months, recently started a vlog series on YouTube to allow her fans to get to know her better. We say bring it on—we love the exposure she's giving not only to ballet but to important social issues.

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