Julia Cinquemani in Los Angeles Ballet's The Sleeping Beauty. Photo by Reed Hutchinson, Courtesy of Los Angeles Ballet.

Miami City Ballet Announces Promotions and New Members

Miami City Ballet just announced their official roster for the 2017-18 season, including some exciting additions to and promotions within the company. The new season, which starts on Oct. 20 in Miami, consists of a 53-member roster that was made complete thanks to six new dancers and the return of former longtime MCB dancer Katia Carranza.

Carranza will be returning to the rank of principal, a spot that she previously held from 2004 until 2007 before joining Ballet de Monterrey as a principal dancer. Other promotions for the upcoming season include Jennifer Lauren to principal, Lauren Fadeley to principal soloist and Ashley Knox to soloist.


Among the dancers joining MCB are current Pennsylvania Ballet principal Alexander Peters and Los Angeles Ballet principal Julia Cinquemani. Peters will be joining MCB as a principal soloist, and Cinquemani will be a member of the corps de ballet.

Get to know the rest of the company's new members, ahead!

Harrison Monaco joins the corps from Pennsylvania Ballet, where he spent the past six seasons.

Eric Beckham will join the corps de ballet, having previously danced with The National Ballet of Canada.

Aaron Hilton will be taking a leave of absence from his studies at Princeton University to join the corps de ballet.

Alyssa Schroeder accepts her first company position in the corps, having received her training at Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet.

For more news on all things ballet, don't miss a single issue.

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