Amy Brandt, Editor in Chief

Amy has been the editor in chief of Pointe magazine since 2014, following a 19-year dance career. She danced professionally with the Milwaukee Ballet and The Suzanne Farrell Ballet, among others, and performed in honor of Ms. Farrell at the 2005 Kennedy Center Honors. While pursuing her college degree part-time, she began writing extensively for several dance publications, including Pointe's "Ask Amy" advice column. Amy graduated summa cum laude from Marymount Manhattan College with a BA in English and World Literatures, and currently serves on its advisory board. Before joining Pointe, she was an associate editor for Dance Teacher and Dance Magazine.


Raymond Mingst, Creative Director

Raymond E. Mingst is the creative director of Pointe Magazine and Dance Magazine. He has been recognized with numerous awards as an art and creative director. He is also an artist, writer and curator.

Emily Giacalone, Art Director

Emily Giacalone earned a BFA in Communication Design (majoring in Illustration) from Pratt Institute. She got her start in magazine design with George Magazine and has worked on a variety of publications including Vogue, Four Seasons, Show People, and Pilates Style. Emily is also the art director for Dance Teacher magazine.


Madeline Schrock, Managing Editor

A native of Floyds Knobs, Indiana, Madeline studied ballet at Southern Indiana School for the Arts and was later introduced to modern dance by Bill Evans. She received her BFA in Dance Performance and Choreography from Ohio University's Honors Tutorial College. As a dance videographer and editor, she has worked on projects for Bates Dance Festival and the Regina Klenjoski Dance Company in Southern California. She later served as a marketing and education manager for Lar Lubovitch Dance Company. Madeline is currently the managing editor of Dance Magazine and Pointe.


Chava Lansky, Assistant Editor

Originally from Amherst, MA, Chava graduated from Barnard College with a B.A. in Dance and a minor in English. She has danced in works by Mark Morris, Lucinda Childs, Loni Landon and Joanna Kotze, among others, and continues to perform in the city, most often in collaboration with Debbie Mausner. Chava has held internships at Jacob's Pillow Dance and the Bates Dance Festival, and was a 2017 Junior Fellow in the Music Division of the Library of Congress. She regularly reviews dance for Musical America, and has written for Dance Magazine, Playbill and Tablet. Chava is currently an assistant editor at Pointe.

Larke Johnson in rehearsal. Courtesy The Joffrey Ballet

Marie and Franz have a new guest at their Christmas Eve party this year. Emma Lookatch and Larke Johnson, both dancers in the Adaptive Dance Program at Joffrey Academy of Dance: Official School of The Joffrey Ballet, are alternating in the new role of Worker Girl. It is a permanent part created specifically for students with disabilities in Christopher Wheeldon's version of The Nutcracker at The Joffrey Ballet.

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Francisco Estevez, Courtesy Colorado Ballet Academy

When you're looking for a ballet program to take you to the next level, there are a lot of factors to consider. While it's tempting to look for the biggest name that will accept you, the savvy dancer knows that successful training has more to do with the attention and opportunities you'll get.

We put together a few of the most important things for dancers to look for in a summer or year-round training program, with the help of the experts at Colorado Ballet Academy:

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Ballet Training
Ballet Austin Academy students practice priouette en dehors. Annie Marie Bloodgood, Courtesy Ballet Austin.

Michelle Martin, associate artistic director of Ballet Austin, says that pirouettes en dehors from fourth position allongé are full of "traps" for dancers. Whether you trained with a straight back leg or have never tried it before, Martin's analytical breakdown will help you master this basic but dazzling turn.

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Rosalie O'Connor, Courtesy US Prix de Ballet

The US Prix de Ballet is taking an unconventional approach to the ballet competition—by putting the competitors' health first. After a successful first year in 2018, the Prix is returning to San Diego, CA this February with an even more comprehensive lineup of wellness workshops and master classes, in addition, of course, to the high-level competition.

Though the talent is top-notch, the environment is friendly, says HARID Conservatory faculty member Victoria Schneider, who serves on US Prix de Ballet's elite panel of judges. "The wellbeing of the dancer is the main focus," says Schneider, who awarded three scholarships to HARID at last year's competition.

US Prix de Ballet was born after its founders traveled to the Japan Grand Prix International Ballet Competition in 2016. "The company ran every aspect of the competition with professionalism, dignity, honor and precision," says founder Neisha Hernandez. "We knew we wanted this level of experience for America."

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