Life After Cedar Lake


Doutel Vaz in Kylián's Indigo Rose. Photo by Sharen Bradford, Courtesy Cedar Lake.

Although Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet's final performances are this week at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, that doesn't mean it's the end of dancing for company member Vânia Doutel Vaz. Pointe spoke with her about closing this chapter and her exciting next step.

What has it been like since the announcement that Cedar Lake would fold?
This whole situation with the company closing makes every dancer feel very, very cherished by the audience. It was beautiful to feel that everybody felt the same way we did, so we weren't alone in that sadness. Support came from all over the world. This was a beautiful journey, and maybe it ended a bit sooner than we wanted, but we did enough to make it worth it.

How have you grown as a dancer since joining in 2010?
When I joined Cedar Lake, I was really obsessed with technique. But I noticed that everybody here had technique; they just weren't focusing on it. They were working on who they are as artists and how they could interpret the work. It took me a while to realize that wasn't against my approach, but it was something that could enhance my dancing. I think I've become a more complete artist.

After Cedar Lake, what's next?
I was offered the lead female role, Lady Macbeth, in Punchdrunk's production of Sleep No More in NYC. I was always drawn to acting and having that intertwined with heavy, intense movement makes me feel like I am about to enter a new path for growth in my career. I can't wait!
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