Leotards Inspired by Greek Gods

The color orange has a special meaning for Keith Lin, designer of KeithLink leotards. To him it signifies sunshine and the happiness of dancing. For six years, Lin’s colleagues in the dance world urged him to start his own line of leotards, and on April 4, the brand launched its first Spring/Summer collection, Awakening.

Lin studied dance at Taipei National University of the Arts but soon realized that his passion lay behind the scenes. He left college to work in a costume design shop, and after three years his mentor told him to open his own workshop. Lin spent the next thirteen years designing costumes for companies like Cloudgate and Taipei Chamber Ballet.

Lin’s debut studio wear collection features eight styles for women and five for men. Unlike most brands, each style comes in one specific color, and Lin only makes twelve leotards for each style because he doesn’t want people to show up to class in the same outfit. Fabric, cut and color are all important elements. “The fabric needs to expand to twice its size,” Lin says, “so that dancers’ movements won’t be restrained by the leotard.”

Lin finds inspiration for his designs in Greek mythology and the statues of gods and goddesses and the lines of their bodies. His leotards take the names of Aphrodite, Arete, and Nymph to reflect the character and romantic essence of the myths.

Lin is very meticulous and treats his every design like a work of art. KeithLink leotards come in a dainty box. The tags, with care instructions, are hand-sewn on after every detail is checked as a sign of approval that the product is ready for sale. Right now leotards can be purchased in Taiwan, and Lin is exploring ways for dancers in the U.S. to purchase his leotards.

“The studio space should be embellished with color and design,” he says. “My vision is that every dancer can take class carefree and stop worrying about their leotard.”

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Pointe is giving away three KeithLink leotards (all size M). Check out our giveaway!

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