Lauren Archer

Ben Malone

Richmond Ballet's Lauren Archer Curates Runway-Inspired Looks on Her Growing Fashion Blog

Whether she's working in the studio with Richmond Ballet or on her fashion blog, Felix & Flora, Lauren Archer's sartorial motto is "Fearless, feminine fashion." Archer's interest in fashion began when she was a little girl, and it took off two years ago when she began sharing her day-to-day looks on Instagram (@felixandflora). "I started my blog for fun, but I've been really passionate about creating new looks, finding new inspiration and reaching a new demographic," Archer says. "I want to encourage people to wear what they like and be less conscious of what others might think—at the end of the day, it's just an outfit."


Gravitating towards dramatic skirts and dresses that give "a twirl factor," Archer's regularly updated blog specializes in creating runway-inspired looks with affordable brands. "I love Zimmermann, Ganni and Dior, but I re-create those styles with brands like H&M, ASOS and Chicwish, which have really cool designer dupes."

Chicwish sweater: "The baubles and big, oversized sleeves look so similar to a sweater dress Zimmermann made."

Who What Wear skirt, from Target: "I like everything high-waisted because it makes your legs look longer and cinches you in at all of the right places."

True Decadence shoes, from ASOS: "These have 3-D flowers on the back that continue my floral theme perfectly."

Even in the studio, Archer's dancewear coordinates with her street style. "Usually my class outfit is inspired by what I wear on my blog," she says, noting that pastel colors and accessories like earrings and lipstick are studio staples. "I like to change up my hair and makeup, too," she adds. "I might do a French twist if we're doing something Balanchine, and on Fridays, we have a sparkle theme at the studio, so I'll try a shimmer eyeshadow."

RubiaWear legwarmers: "I wear these every day, and I have them in white and pink with stripes."

Uniqlo vest: "I've had this for about 10 years now, and it's still in perfect condition," Archer says. "I wear my warm-ups at barre and in between rehearsals only."

Elevé leotard: "I like that you can customize Elevé leotards with mesh and floral details, and you can even choose the color pairing you want."

Handmade skirt by former company dancer Lauren Fagone: "A few of the dancers at Richmond Ballet and their family members

Photos by Ben Malone

Latest Posts


Left to right: Dance Theatre of Harlem's Daphne Lee, Amanda Smith, Lindsey Donnell and Alexandra Hutchinson in a scene from Dancing Through Harlem. Derek Brockington, Courtesy Dance Theatre of Harlem

Dancers Share Their Key Takeaways After a Year of Dancing on Film

Creating dances specifically for film has become one of the most effective ways that ballet companies have connected with audiences and kept dancers employed during the pandemic. Around the world, dance organizations are finding opportunities through digital seasons, whether conceiving cinematic, site-specific pieces or filming works within a traditional theater. And while there is a consistent sentiment that nothing will ever substitute the thrill of a live show, dancers are embracing this new way of performing.

Keep reading SHOW LESS

#TBT: Mikhail Baryshnikov in "Fancy Free" (1981)

In Jerome Robbins's 1944 ballet Fancy Free, three sailors on leave spend the day at a bar, attempting to woo two young women by out-dancing and out-charming one another. In this clip from 1981, Mikhail Baryshnikov, who was then both the artistic director of American Ballet Theatre and a leading performer with the company, pulls out all the stops to win the ladies' affections.

Keep reading SHOW LESS
Bethany Kirby, Courtesy Tulsa Ballet

An Infectious-Disease Physician on What Vaccines Mean for Ballet

As the coronavirus pandemic grinds into its second year, the toll on ballet companies—and dancers—has been steep. How long before dancers can rehearse and perform as they once did?

Like most things, the return to normal for ballet seems to hinge on vaccinations. Just over 22 percent of people in the U.S. are now vaccinated, a way from the estimated 70 to 85 percent experts believe can bring back something similar to pre-pandemic life.

But what would it mean for 100 percent of a ballet company to be vaccinated? Tulsa Ballet artistic director Marcello Angelini is about to find out—and hopes it brings the return of big ballets on the big stage.

"I don't think companies like ours can survive doing work for eight dancers in masks," Angelini says. "If we want to work, dance, and be in front of an audience consistently and with the large works that pay the bills, immunization is the only road that leads there."

Keep reading SHOW LESS

Editors' Picks