Photo by Joe Toreno

Keenan Kampa's Breezy Style Has Us Dreaming of Summer

This story originally appeared in the October/November 2015 issue of Pointe.

Keenan Kampa counts Alexa Chung and Iris Apfel among her fashion inspirations, but her favorite style icon is someone she considers one of her best friends. “Not to be weird," she says, “but I really loved my grandfather's style. He was this badass marine nuclear physicist, but then also this old Irish man." His oversized button-ups in plaid or denim (“he always liked a front pocket," she adds) have become a staple of her wardrobe. She favors comfortable, flattering pieces that work with her active lifestyle—you'll often find her riding her bike—in neutral tones like black, white or head-to-toe denim. “If I'm going to do a color, I commit to it and do it all," she says. In the studio, loose-fitting layers are her go-to. “I hate when I feel like I can't reach a line fully because of clothing restrictions, and leotards that are too tight," she says, adding that sometimes she'll wear swimsuits instead. “I'm at kind of a different stage than I was a few years ago. I used to go to class with things that were a little bit more fun and flashy. Now it's just things that make me feel good."



Photo by Joe Toreno

The Details—Street

Denim shirt: “This is from a little vintage store in Paris and was probably a man's. I wear a lot of men's clothing."
Jeffrey Campbell boots: “I love these boots so much, I have two pairs. They're dressy enough that I can start off the day with them, and at night I can go out and they look good."
Printed bag: “I got this when I was at the Cannes Film Festival. There's this French designer who takes pictures of her pug dog and dresses him up and then puts it on pillowcases and wallets and stuff."


Photo by Joe Toreno

The Details—Studio

Adidas shirt: “I have a lot of Adidas stuff. They're clever and creative—they're doing collaborations with so many designers, too."
Black pants: “I think after being in ballet school for so long and then transitioning to a company, I'm tired of dancing just in my leotard and skirt."
Sansha slippers: “For flats I wear Sanshas because they're comfortable and they're wide enough. I'm always in-between brands with my pointe shoes."

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