Ballet Stars

Ballet West's Katlyn Addison on Why She Wraps Her Toes With Hockey Tape & Other Dance Bag Essentials

Photo by Kyle Froman for Pointe.

Much of what Ballet West soloist Katlyn Addison carries around in her (two) dance bags has been repurposed. She wraps her toes in black hockey tape which her brother, a National Hockey League player in their home country of Canada, ships to her, and she keeps her bobby pins in an old glass salsa jar. "I like to reuse things," says Addison. She totes everything around in shopping bags (one for pointe shoes and sewing tools, one for everything else) from the clothing store Free People.

Pro Pointe Shoe Hacks From Ballet West's Katlyn Addison www.youtube.com


Addison's routine is filled with other hacks as well. Though she carries a heating pad, it's not for her muscles—it's for her shoes. "I always wear socks for barre, so by the time I put on my shoes they're nice and toasty, and softer." And she's never without a bottle of avocado oil, which she uses in her hair to counter Salt Lake City's dry climate. Another staple for Addison is a journal. "I'm also a choreographer," she says. "Anytime I get inspired by other dancers, I write it down; I usually get ideas for pieces by watching ballet class."


Photo by Kyle Froman for Pointe.

The Goods

Clockwise from top right: heating pad, fruit and nuts ("to snack on right after class"), avocado oil, deodorant, towel, coconut oil for skin, bobby pin jar, mints, phone, gum ("the other dancers know me for always having bubble gum"), choreographic journal, 2nd Skin Squares, MAC lipstick, Estée Lauder lip gloss, rubber balls ("the pink one's for my feet and the blue one's for my hips"), Thera-Band, hockey tape, Satellite City Instant Glue, pointe shoe tools, pouch for jewelry with watch and necklace, foundation for pointe shoes, Bloch Heritage pointe shoes, Yeti thermos for water, Free People shopping bags.

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