Kathryn Morgan is back! Erin Baiano.

Kathryn Morgan Is Restarting Her Dance Career at Miami City Ballet

Congratulations are in order for Kathryn Morgan! After a long struggle with hypothyroidism, which led to the ballerina's resignation from New York City Ballet in 2012, Morgan is now set to dive back into full-time professional dance as a soloist at Miami City Ballet.


The news broke yesterday, delighting everyone who's missed Morgan's singular presence onstage. We're excited to see her tackle MCB's repertoire—with its Balanchine roots, it'll probably feel familiar to the NYCB alum.

MCB is also welcoming Carlos Quenedit as a principal; promoting company dancers Alexander Peters, Emily Bromberg, Shimon Ito, and Chase Swatosh; and bringing in eight new corps dancers. Congrats and merde to all!

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