You're probably used to jotting down rehearsal notes and corrections, but according to research from the University of Pennsylvania's Positive Psychology Center, you may want to save room in your journal for these exercises, too. The writing prompts were designed to boost your well-being by focusing on the positive.


1. Mine your memory

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Recall a time in your life when you felt your best, and write it down with story structure—a clear beginning, middle and end. Over the course of a week, reread it daily, and answer this question: "What personal strengths did I display when I was at my best?" Journaling about your strengths, whether you identify passion, creativity or kindness, can make you more aware of them and more likely to use them.

2. The short list

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You spilled your coffee this morning, missed your bus and fell out of half your turns. But what about the good things that happened today? Spend 10 minutes before bed writing down three positive moments. Then, journal about why each event happened. Constructive reflection can help you form a habit of seeing the good in things more often.

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