Jennifer Garner. Courtesy Conversations on Dance.

Listen to Self-Proclaimed Bunhead Jennifer Garner on the Conversations on Dance Podcast

Ever since 2017, Jennifer Garner has been proving herself as ballet's biggest fangirl. From her incredible cameo backstage at American Ballet Theatre's Nutcracker to her insistence that she is the third Cindy, we've been here for all of it. This week, we finally got to the bottom of Garner's ballet obsession, thanks to the podcast Conversations on Dance.


Hosted by former Miami City Ballet dancers Rebecca King Ferraro and Michael Sean Breeden, COD releases a new episode each Monday diving into the world of professional dance. Yesterday, Ferraro and Breeden published their interview with Garner, conducted in her Los Angeles home. The Golden Globe Award-winning actress shares how growing up dancing shaped her career, from the work ethic and sense of rigor it instilled in her to her penchant for physically challenging roles (like the epic Thriller dance scene from 13 Going on 30). Their hour-long conversation includes all kinds of gems, like which dancers Garner is currently stalking on Instagram, and how she used to chew gum behind her teacher's back in ballet class to get her friends to laugh.

Ferraro and Breeden end each episode with a lightning round of quick questions, and this time is no exception. Garner tells us her ballet dream role (the Waltz Girl in Serenade), her dream dance partner (James Whiteside... aka Cindy), and the person she'd most like to have dinner with (George Balanchine). This episode left us fangirling her right back. But don't take our word for it—COD's interview with Gardner is available on iTunes, Spotify and iHeartRadio.

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