Studio to Street: Diana Vishneva

Diana Vishneva likes a little extravagance. Her preferred fashion labels include Céline and Marni. On tour, she carries Louis Vuitton bags, custom made to tote not just clothing and toiletries but also her tutus and pointe shoes. Each piece is stamped with her initials, DV. When asked about her most prized items, though, she sways toward sentiment. “I got a gift from Natalia Makarova, a shawl made from goat wool. I take it with me everywhere,” she says. “And there are the warm socks my mom has been knitting for me since my childhood. If you can believe it, she still makes them for me today.” It seems that even the biggest stars can’t live without their creature comforts.

 

The Details—Street
Vishneva likes dance attire that transitions easily. Her preference for stylish comfort was evident when Pointe caught up with her during her recent performances in Costa Mesa, California, where she sported lightweight pants, simple ballet flats and a jacket casually layered over an easy T-shirt. She usually opts for cool blue and gray tones. “I don’t like shiny or bright,” she says.


The Details—Studio

“Dance isn’t about fashion. It’s more important that my body feels warm and I can keep it at a good temperature,” says Vishneva. That’s why she layers: tights under pants and socks under ballet shoes. And she likes to mix dancewear and athletic wear, depending on whether she’s rehearsing classical or contemporary work.

Latest Posts


Getty Images

Hiding Injuries: Why Downplaying Pain Can Lead to Bigger Problems Down the Road

Sabrina Landa was thrilled to be offered a traineeship with Pennsylvania Ballet. "As a trainee, everything felt like a chance to prove myself as a professional," she says. Her training hours increased and she was dancing more than she ever had before. When Landa began experiencing pain in her metatarsals partway through the 2018 Nutcracker season, she notified the staff. "But in fear of losing my shows, I downplayed the severity of it," Landa says.

She notes that no one pushed her to keep dancing but herself. "I was 18 and was aiming to receive a contract by the end of the year," she says. "I felt so much anxiety over missing an opportunity that I was afraid to be honest about my pain." Pennsylvania Ballet's artistic staff were understanding and supportive, but Landa minimized her injury for the next few months, wanting to push through until the season ended and contracts were offered. But after months of pain and an onset of extreme weakness in her foot, Landa was diagnosed with two stress fractures in her second and third metatarsals. She spent the next three months on crutches and six months off dancing to allow for the fractures' delayed healing.

Keep reading SHOW LESS
Skjalg Bøhmer Vold, Courtesy Merritt Moore

How Quantum Physicist Ballerina Merritt Moore Learned to Dance With a Robot (Plus, Her Newest Film)

When the world went into lockdown last March, most dancers despaired. But not Merritt Moore. The Los Angeles native, who lives in London and has danced with Norwegian National Ballet, English National Ballet and Boston Ballet, holds a PhD in atomic and laser physics from the University of Oxford. A few weeks into the coronavirus pandemic, she came up with a solution for having to train and work alone: robots.

Keep reading SHOW LESS

Lauren Anderson's Tips for Relevé Développé Écarté Devant

Développé écarté relevé "is in every class, every ballet," says Lauren Anderson, former principal dancer and current program manager of education and community engagement at Houston Ballet. Below, she gives you the keys to success for this "light and lovely" repertoire staple.

Keep reading SHOW LESS

Editors' Picks