Inside Prix de Lausanne: Semi-Finalists Announced

After a long day of classical and contemporary performances, 67 candidates for this year’s Prix de Lausanne were whittled down to 20 finalists, including one American: 15-year-old Lauren Hunter. Dancers from Asia (Japan, South Korea and China) dominate the list, but there are also finalists from Australia, Brazil and various countries in Europe.

Here’s a rundown of who will be performing at the finals tomorrow:

Lauren Hunter. Photo by R. Buas, Courtesy Prix de Lausanne.

Girls, 15-16 years old

Lauren Hunter, 15, USA (Peninsula School of Performing Arts)

Yuika Fujimoto, 15, Japan (Koike Ballet Studio)

Jessi Seymour, 15, Australia (Alegria School of Ballet)

Sunmin Lee, 16, South Korea (Seoul Arts High School)

Rafaela Henrique, 16, Brazil (Especial Academia de Ballet)

Diana Georgia Ionescu, 16, Romania (Tanz Akademie Zurich)

 

Boys, 15-16 years old

Koyo Yamamoto, 15, Japan (Acri Horimoto Ballet Academy)

Edoardo Sartori, 16, Italy (Academia Veneta di Danza e Balletto)

Denilson Almeida, 16, Brazil (Petite Danse School of Dance)

Joshua Jack Price, 16, Australia (Amanda Bollinger Dance Academy & The Dance Centre)

Jingkun Xu, 16, China (Shanghai Dance School)

Alessandro Frola, 16, Italy (Professione Danza Parma)

 

Girls, 17-18 years old

Ji Min Kwon, 17, South Korea (Seoul Arts High School)

Marina Fernandes da Costa Duarte, 17, Brazil (Académie Princess Grace)

Fangqi Li, 18, China (The Secondary Dance School of Beijing Dance Academy)

 

Boys, 17-18 years old

Sunu Lim, 17, South Korea (Sunhwa Arts High School)

Michele Esposito, 17, Italy (Tanz Akademie Zurich)

Taisuki Nakao, 17, Japan (Akademie des Tanzes)

Riku Ota, 18, Japan (John Cranko Schule)

Stanislaw Wegrzyn, 18, Poland (Ballett-Akademie Hochschule für Musik und Theater München)

 

Tune in to Prix de Lausanne’s website for a live stream of the finals Saturday, February 4, from 8am‑noon.

 

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