News

What's in a Name? Houston Ballet's New "Romeo and Juliet"

Houston Ballet artistic director Stanton Welch. Photo by Rosalie O'Connor, Courtesy HB.

In celebration of Shakespeare's 450th anniversary, Houston Ballet is premiering Romeo and Juliet, choreographed by Stanton Welch. The company's 2014–15 season is devoted to the Bard, and includes John Neumeier's A Midsummer Night's Dream and John Cranko's The Taming of the Shrew. February, the love month, will feature Welch's reimagining of Shakespeare's most famous romance, to be performed February 26–March 8. It's been nearly three decades since the company presented a new production of the ballet.

Traditional versions of Romeo and Juliet take many liberties with the story. Not so in Welch's rendition. "I tried to return to the play, so you will see scenes that haven't been represented before," says Welch. "Today's audiences are quite capable of absorbing the whole story." In Welch's version, Mercutio's character, which is often vague in the ballet, will be clarified to show that he is neither Montague nor Capulet, but rather part of the Escalus family.

"Romeo and Juliet is a triple threat," says Welch. "Terrific acting, dancing and music."

The Conversation
Ballet Training
Getty Images

When the curtain falls, your work isn't over: That's exactly when post-show recovery begins. According to Carina Nasrallah, Houston Methodist athletic trainer for Houston Ballet, timing is everything. The 30 minutes after a performance is the optimal window to start combatting soreness and encourage muscle repair. Here, she shares the essential elements of a recovery plan from curtain call until bedtime.

Keep reading... Show less
Viral Videos
Brittany Cavaco in Until Midnight. Claire Morris, Courtesy Cavaco.

A white tulle dress, time travel, the Eiffel Tower at night... these elements come together in Until Midnight, a new dance film by Christopher Alexander of Zen Film Works. This eight-minute long vignette opens with Louise (played by Louise Schirmer), a former ballerina now living alone in old age. Through the delivery of a mysterious letter and a wristwatch from her past, she returns briefly to her youthful self, danced by former Washington Ballet dancer Brittany Cavaco. In a Cinderella-like twist, Louise has until midnight to find her beloved Jean Pierre (Sebastien Thill, former dancer with Paris Opera Ballet and Hamburg Ballet) for one last dance. According to Cavaco, all of the movement was improvised, created by herself and Alexander in each location.

Keep reading... Show less
Ballet Training
Peter Boal in class a New York City Center. Courtesy PNB.

"People have so much fear associated with arabesque turns," says Peter Boal, artistic director of Pacific Northwest Ballet. Here, he shares images and ideas to help you confidently master this advanced pirouette. "It's a real accomplishment when you can put it all together."

Keep reading... Show less