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Houston Ballet Down Under #4: Opening Night

From June 24–July 10, Houston Ballet is embarking on its biggest tour yet to Melbourne, Australia, hometown of artistic director Stanton Welch. Pointe asked demi-soloist Jacquelyn Long to keep a diary of her experiences.

June 30, 2016


Getting notes backstage after dress rehearsal. They were practicing scene changes on the stage, so we squished.

Opening night was a success! We had a dress rehearsal in the early afternoon with a different cast, and I think everyone was a bit tired. A few of us even napped in our dressing rooms to get a boost. There’s also a cafeteria in the theater, which is so nice. I wish we had one in Houston! Most of the dancers got their food and coffee there during the break.

The audience was packed for opening night. There were definitely some nerves in the air, but I think the cast felt very ready to get the shows rolling. The leads all danced beautifully. The show itself went very well from what I saw, and the audience was very responsive. There were even gasps during the fight scenes. We had an actual sword-fighting teacher work with us when it was originally choreographed, so it definitely gets scary. I'm scared on stage sometimes, and I know the choreography!

Before opening night as Katerina. Yes, I brought Cheez-Its to Australia!

After the show there was a reception with The Australian Ballet. It was very nice to mingle with the Aussie dancers. They were all so sweet and eager to help us with recommendations of restaurants and shops. Actually, everyone in Melbourne has been nothing but nice, from coffee baristas to shop owners. It makes traveling to a foreign country so much more fun.

I'm excited for another show tonight!

 

Xo,

Jacquelyn

(Photos by Jacquelyn Long.)

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