In September 2004, a pair of siblings graced the Dance Magazine cover. Inside, the accompanying story wrote, "When the Cornejos dance, it's never merely a variation—it's a complete performance."


A Dance Magazine cover featuring the Cornejos leaping among illustrated planets and stars

The brother and sister from Buenos Aires were winning over American Ballet Theatre fans, garnering "fervent applause and almost as fervent reviews," wrote Hanna Rubin.

Erica was beloved for her musical phrasing and easy jumps, while Herman won over audiences with his technical brilliance and elegant lines. Both oozed charisma onstage.

But two years after the story came out, Erica left New York City to join Boston Ballet as a principal, and fans lost the ability to see the pair onstage together. Until now.

Although she retired from performing in 2017 and now directs Integrarte ballet school in Boston, Erica is making a special return to the ABT stage on October 26 to dance a pas de deux with Herman in celebration of his 20th anniversary with the company.

The piece holds extra significance for the two dancers: The Cornejos first performed El Chamuyo at a gala for Argentina held at the Metropolitan Opera House's grand tier in 1998. At the time, they were members of ABT star Julio Bocca's touring company, Ballet Argentino. So while in New York for the performance, they took company class at ABT—and were quickly asked to join the Studio Company. Now, their story is coming full circle, celebrating a milestone with the same work that brought them to the company in the first place.

The special evening will also see Herman dancing the title role in Apollo (his New York debut) and a leading role in Twyla Tharp's new A Gathering of Ghosts. We expect nothing less than "fervent applause."

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Darian Volkova, Courtesy Shayer

After years of rigorous training, ballet dancers become accustomed to constructive and oftentimes harsh criticism. Being scrutinized is something that comes with the territory.

I myself spent the better half of my high school years in Russia, where political correctness does not get in the way of progress. We were trained to use criticism as fuel to propel us forward. Everything said in class or rehearsal was meant to help better ourselves and not to be taken personally.

But where is the line between helpful advice and offensive language?

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News
Greta Hodgkinson and Guillaume Côté in Margeurite and Armand. Karolina Kuras, Courtesy National Ballet of Canada.

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Training
Students at Sun King Dance's Adult Ballet Camp. Jenny McQueen of Capture Photography, Courtesy Sun King Dance.

For adult recreational dancers, summer isn't just a time for swapping out warm-up sweaters for breezy tees—it's also about taking your training to the next level, and perhaps packing your bags for a ballet workshop. Why should teens and pre-professionals have all of the fun? Fortunately, there are scores of adult summer programs all over the United States, and even abroad for those of you looking to sprinkle in a little sightseeing after your final reverénce. (Can't wait for summer? Check out these spring workshops at National Ballet of Canada and Sarasota Ballet.)

What can adults expect from a weekend or a week of dance training? Everything from technique to repertoire to yoga. Most of all, it's a chance to just dig in and dance, without a pesky to-do list waiting for you after class. Here are some summer programs designed for adult recreational dancers to keep on your radar.

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