Courtesy Grishko ltd. (Moscow, Russia)

Grishko ltd. (Moscow, Russia) Is Now Selling In the U.S. As Nikolay—But You Can Still Get All Your Favorite Shoe Models

If you're one of the many American ballet dancers who loyally wear Grishko pointe shoes, you may have noticed something different about your shoes recently.

In the midst of a lawsuit, Grishko ltd. is now selling in the U.S. under the name Nikolay to reduce confusion and ensure that American dancers get the high-quality shoes they've come to expect.


The lawsuit is expected to continue into 2020—but Grishko ltd. didn't want to leave dancers in the U.S. without shoes in the meantime. To stabilize the supply of shoes from factories to the U.S., the company decided to operate under the name Nikolay (the first name of the company's founder and president, Nikolay Grishko) in the U.S.

You can expect the same quality shoes that Grishko ltd. is known for—in fact the Nikolay products will be using Grishko ltd.'s protected technology to create the exact same models as before. The shoes will have the same names (Nova, Smart Pointe, Maya I, Exam, etc), and will have the same distinctive diamond and honeycomb sole patterns.

One exception: The company's best-selling shoe has been updated and is now known as the 3007. The model is new-and-improved with easier roll-up to demi-pointe and a microfiber heel counter that molds to the foot and prevents slippage.

More benefits to the change: Retailers will now be getting shoes fresh from the factory, eliminating any middle man. Nikolay is also selling an extended range of dancewear products to the U.S., including heat retention dancewear, wool knitted warm-ups and pointe shoe dryers.

How do you ensure that you're buying Nikolay shoes from the Grishko ltd. factories? The soles of your shoes should say "Nikolay: Made In Russia":

A close up of the bottom of the sole of a pointe shoe, with the size and the words "Nikolay: Made in Russia."

Courtesy Grishko ltd. (Moscow, Russia)

To find U.S. retailers offering Nikolay shoes, follow @nikolayworld on Instagram and search for the hashtag #nikolayretailer.

The new official online shop for U.S. customers—https://www.nikolay-world.com—will be launched soon.

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