As an editor at Pointe, sometimes I feel like a kid in a candy store. I'm constantly surrounded by all things ballet, I'm able to see some of the best performances and I get to meet many of the dancers and artists I idolized when I was growing up. I know that I am one incredibly lucky bunhead. So as I stuff my face with turkey and pumpkin pie tomorrow, here are a few of the top ballet-related things I will be thankful for.

 

1. This performance of The Royal Ballet's Marienela Nunez in Kenneth MacMillan's Concerto. I think the word sublime might have been invented to describe Nunez' dancing in this ballet.

 

2. The rumble roller. Yes, I know it looks like a torture device. But just find one and lie on it. Your body will thank you.

 

3. Rosine Bena. The first true ballerina I ever saw, my first ballet teacher and the first person who made me understand the meaning of artistry.

 

4. Cedar Lake. I sometimes wish I lived in Europe so that I could see all of the innovative work they produce in a continent where arts funding and forward thinking are simply more plentiful. At least I can get a taste of that through Cedar Lake, which brings such amazing choreographers as Ohad Naharin and Hofesh Shechter to stage work here in New York. 

 

5. The smell of a brand new pair of pointe shoes. Dance Magazine's editor in chief Wendy Perron first pointed out to me how delightful it is to stick your nose inside a box (before it's been worn, that is).

 

6. Christopher Wheeldon's After The Rain. The hauntingly beautiful pas de deux, set to Arvo Part's Spiegel im Spiegel, brings me to tears every time.

 

7. Kirov Ballet second soloist Ekaterina Kondaurova. I think I would be entranced by her movement even if she were simply frying an egg. Luckily though, the Kirov casts her much more breathtaking movement by Forsythe and...

 

8. Alexei Ratmansky. When people like Jennifer Homans declare that ballet is dead, I am so thankful we have choreographers like Ratmansky to prove them dead wrong. 

Instagram

Are you a total bunhead who loves to write? You might be the perfect fit for Pointe. We're seeking an editorial intern who's equally passionate about ballet and journalism.

Keep reading...
Viral Videos

Earlier this month, 15-year-old American dancer Ava Arbuckle was one of eight scholarship winners at the Prix de Lausanne. For her classical selection, Arbukle, clad in an ultra-feminine, rosette-covered tutu, performed Flora's variation from The Awakening of Flora, Marius Petipa's 1894 one-act ballet about the Greek goddess of Spring. Back in 2007, historian and choreographer Sergei Vikharev reconstructed the work for the Mariinsky Ballet, with Evgenia Obraztsova, then a soloist at the Mariinsky and now principal at the Bolshoi Ballet, originating the titular Flora.

Keep reading...
Profiles
National Ballet of Canada's Chelsy Meiss wearing the personal "Dying Swan" tutu of Canadian ballet star Evelyn Hart. "Our costumes have the ability to transcend ballet lineage across countries and through the past, present and future," says Meiss.

Traditionally, ballet costumes are made to have a life of 20 to 30 years. But they sometimes remain in use for much longer, being worn and altered to fit dozens of dancers. Multiple rows of hooks and bars show this progression, but it's more apparent inside the costume, where numerous labels can be found bearing the names of all past wearers.

Keep reading...
Viral Videos

Yesterday, the first of Nike's new Common Thread video series dropped, and we were thrilled to see that it featured dancers; namely, Dance Theatre of Harlem member (and June/July 2017 Pointe cover star) Ingrid Silva, and Florida-based ballet student Alex Thomas. Even better, it's narrated by tennis phenom Serena Williams. This series of short videos celebrates Black History Month by focusing on representation in sport. (We're not crazy about ballet being called a sport, but we'll let it slide.) In each installment, athletes united by a common thread discuss their passion, and the lack of role models they saw in their fields while growing up.

Keep reading...